Academic Catalog 2022-2023 
    
    Aug 11, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2022-2023

Traditional, CUS Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program.

College of Undergraduate Studies

Courses

Business

  •  

    BUS 500 - International Business Practicum

    (3) This applied International Business course building upon prior global knowledge is an intensive study abroad experience of 3.5 weeks in a foreign country. Students will visit many types of organizations and participate in a number of cultural site visits designed to develop a deep understanding of business/economic, political, social, technological, and theological issues, with extensive readings, presentations, and papers required.

    Prerequisites: BUS 370 , Juniors and Seniors only.
    Fee
    Course fee applies.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.

Chemistry

  •  

    CHM 111 - Nutrition

    (3) Nutrients and their functions in the body. Nutrition and health, clinical applications of nutrition, and facts and fallacies of diet. Meets nutrition prerequisites for students planning to enter various advanced programs for health science-oriented professions.

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 121 - General Chemistry I

    (4) Atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and gas and solution chemistry.

    Prerequisites: MAT 111  or MAT 115  or MAT 141 .
    Corequisites: CHM 131  (Lab), CHM 141  (Recitation).

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    CHM 122 - General Chemistry II

    (4) Major concepts in four areas of chemistry: physical chemistry (kinetics and equilibrium), analytical chemistry (acids, base, redox), inorganic chemistry (atmospheric chemistry and metals), organic chemistry (alkanes and function groups).

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in CHM 121 .
    Corequisites: CHM 132  (Lab), CHM 142  (Recitation).

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 131 - General Chemistry I Lab

    (1)

    Corequisites: CHM 121 .

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Three-hour lab.
    Fee
    Lab fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CHM 132 - General Chemistry II Lab

    (1)

    Corequisites: CHM 122 .

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Three-hour lab.
    Fee
    Lab fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 141 - General Chemistry I Recitation

    (0)

    Corequisites: CHM 121 .

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    CHM 142 - General Chemistry II Recitation

    (0)

    Corequisites: CHM 122 .

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
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    CHM 161 - Chemistry for Engineers

    (4) General chemistry requirement for engineering students. Stoichiometry; thermodynamics; gases, liquids, and solids; equilibrium; acids and bases; bonding concepts; kinetics; reactions; and materials science.

    Prerequisites: Engineering Major (A.S. or B.S.) or instructor permission. High School Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, or equivalent.
    Corequisites: CHM 171 , CHM 181 

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 171 - Chemistry for Engineers Laboratory

    (1) Laboratory studies to accompany CHM 161  Chemistry for Engineers.

    Prerequisites: Engineering Major (A.S. or B.S.) or instructor permission. High School Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, or equivalent.
    Corequisites: CHM 161 CHM 181 

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Lab course.
    Fee
    Lab fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 181 - Chemistry for Engineers Recitation

    (0) Recitation section to accompany CHM 161  Chemistry for Engineers.

    Prerequisites: Engineering Major (A.S. or B.S.) or instructor permission. High School Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, or equivalent.
    Corequisites: CHM 161 , CHM 171 

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 221 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4) Introduction to the study of structure, reactions, properties, and mechanisms of organic molecules.

    Prerequisites: CHM 122 .
    Corequisites: CHM 231  (Lab), CHM 241  (Recitation).

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    CHM 222 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4) Continuation of CHM 221 . Emphasis on organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Chemistry of heterocycles and biologically related compounds introduced.

    Prerequisites: CHM 221 .
    Corequisites: CHM 232  (Lab), CHM 242  (Recitation).

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
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    CHM 231 - Organic Chemistry I Lab

    (1) Basic organic procedures using microscale lab techniques, computer simulation, and data acquisition.

    Corequisites: CHM 221 .

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Three-hour lab.
    Fee
    Lab fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CHM 232 - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1) Continuation of CHM 231 .

    Corequisites: CHM 222 .

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Three-hour lab.
    Fee
    Lab fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 241 - Organic Chemistry I Recitation

    (0)

    Corequisites: CHM 221 .

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    CHM 242 - Organic Chemistry II Recitation

    (0)

    Corequisites: CHM 222 .

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 331 - Biochemistry

    (3) Introduction to principles of biochemistry for science and health science-oriented majors. Topics include protein structure, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism and metabolic control, and the molecular biology of gene expression. Special topics include metabolic disorders, the biochemistry of cancer, and the human genome project.

    Prerequisites: CHM 222 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CHM 450 - Internship

    (3-6) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    No more than 3 credit hours of an internship can be applied toward the major.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
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    CHM 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    CHM 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    CHM 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.

Communication

  •  

    COM 103 - Public Speaking

    (3) Introductory principles of communication emphasizing public speaking. Aspects of verbal and nonverbal delivery, speech organization, and the effective use of supporting material and presentational aids are addressed. Students give several speeches designed to better equip them for future speaking endeavors

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    COM 180 - University Media Workshop - Level I

    (1) This lab course is designed for students to work individually and collaboratively in a media environment to develop basic skills through various creative tools to produce and create content for various CCU student media outlets.

    Notes: Lab course; may be repeated for maximum of 3 credits.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    COM 200 - Communication in the Modern World

    (3) This introductory course exposes students to the main areas of scholarship and research within the field of communication, including subfields of interpersonal, organizational, rhetorical, and strategic communication. Students are introduced to the fundamental issues and concerns involved in the academic and professional fields of communication, with emphasis on understanding various approaches to communication employed within the field.

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    COM 203 - Argumentation and Persuasion

    (3) Covers basic principles and techniques of argumentation and persuasion, including both classical and contemporary theories and approaches with emphases on message construction, critical thinking, analysis and presentation.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    COM 204 - Nonverbal Communication

    (3) Discusses basic theories and research related to nonverbal communication. Also looks at the functions and types of nonverbal communication and their impact on relationships.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    When Offered
    Every odd fall semester.
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    COM 206 - Visual Storytelling and Digital Media Production

    (3) Through readings, lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises, critical thinking and collaborative teamwork, students explore the art and business of visual storytelling. The course has an emphasis of storytelling through graphic design for print and online digital media, media pre-production, production and digital non-linear editing, and includes writing and photography to complement the general skills needed by a business professional working in the communication/media field.

    Fee
    Course Fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    COM 210 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3) Offers an examination of relational development, conflict management, self-concept, self-disclosure, and attraction within the context of one-on-one communication.

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 215 - Strategic Communication and Mass Media

    (3) This survey course introduces students to strategic communication practice in the 21st century, immerses students in the strategic concepts necessary to understand how effective decisions are developed and executed in the field of strategic communication, and explores various communication mediums with particular emphasis on media used daily and the ethical principles and standards used to communicate mediated messages.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 247 - Writing for Communication

    (3) This course prepares students to write efficiently and creatively across different print and media platforms. Emphasis is on the diverse formats of writing in print, for broadcast, business, and online settings as well as the distinct styles, formats, and philosophies of those mediums. Students develop a portfolio with professional writing pieces for strategic communication, media, online platforms, and advanced study.

    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
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    COM 251 - Communication Field Internship

    (1-3) Field experience in applied communication. This lower-division course is especially valuable to students with fewer than 75 credit hours completed who want to begin exploring different career options in communication early in their academic work.

    Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.
    Notes: Elective credit only. May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    COM 280 - University Media Workshop - Level II

    (1) Students in this course progress to an advanced skill level in creating, writing, directing, editing, and producing media content using media equipment and software designed for these purposes.

    Prerequisites: COM 180 
    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Lab course.
    Notes: Lab course; may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    COM 285 - Public Relations Agency

    (1) In this active learning experience which recreates the daily life of a public relations creative agency, students work as a public relations team to address clients’ needs, develop public relations materials, and manage strategic communication campaigns.

    Prerequisites: COM 206 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
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    COM 297 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 301 - Advanced Public Speaking

    (3) Integrates theory and development of advanced skill sets related to effective oral communication. Uses a variety of speaking assignments designed to provide a broad context for skill development.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    Notes: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 314 - Cross-Cultural Communication

    (3) Examines Issues, theories, research, and strategies related to developing effective communication practices between diverse cultures. Consideration of biblical principles related to peoples and issues within various cultural backgrounds and experiences.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    COM 315 - Public Relations

    (3) Introduces and develops a clear concept of public relations as a communication profession along with the necessary skills to become proficient in the field. Topics include the function of public relations in both public and private enterprises, the process of planning and implementing a public relations communication campaign, techniques for communicating with various publics, crisis communication, and the laws and ethics governing the practice of public relations.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 COM 247 .  
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
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    COM 320 - Small Group Communication

    (3) Systematic study and practice of the principles of effective communication in groups; exploration of features unique to small group interaction including the exploration of public discussion formats.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    Notes: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 325 - Communication Research Methods

    (3) This course examines the major theories and research paradigms in communication, with particular attention to evaluating the work from a Christian perspective. The course focuses on social scientific, interpretive and critical theories and research methodologies, and will cover the process of conducting research including basic inquiry, collecting/analyzing data, and reporting results.

    Prerequisites: MAT 212 ; Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 355 - Social Media, Audience Analysis, and Analytics

    (3) This course is designed to help students identify, study, and analyze audiences on social media in order to prepare better strategic communication messages. Students will discuss both the benefits and limitations of relying on social media data compared to traditional methods of marketing research, and learn how to develop effective social media messages and campaigns.

    Prerequisites: COM 206 
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    COM 360 - Persuasion and Attitude Change

    (3) This course prepares students to understand the relationship between persuasion and social change, including theories of attitude and behavioral change, and contemporary theories of persuasion. Students will think critically about message strategies and tactics, and consider attitude formation and change through strategic communication.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 375 - Visual Culture and Graphic Design

    (3) This course will teach students how to examine and appreciate elements of culture expressed through visual images, and to develop a visual eye. Students will learn how to design with specific audiences in mind, and edit images using Classic Adobe Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, and lnDesign.

    Prerequisites: COM 206 , Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    COM 380 - University Media Workshop - Level III

    (1) Students in this course have developed advanced skill level in creating, writing, directing, editing, and producing media content and service in various leadership roles (e.g., producers editors, designers) in student media productions.

    Prerequisites: COM 280 ; Sophomore standing. 
    Notes: Lab course; may be repeated for maximum of 3 credits.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    COM 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  •  

    COM 397 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 398 - Special Topics: Advanced Skill Development

    (1) This course allows students to learn essential skills in strategic communication and digital media on specific topics. Various aspects of web and graphic design and audio and video production are some of the topics that may be taught in this course. 

    Prerequisites: COM 206  or instructor permission. 
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit, but only 3 total credit hours count toward the major (Strategic Communication with Digital Media emphasis ) or minor (Digital Media ). 
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 403 - Organizational Communication

    (3) Integration of communication, management, and organizational theory; provides historical and contemporary vantage points of communication’s role in organizational operation.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every fall semster.
  •  

    COM 445 - Strategic Communication Campaigns

    (3) This course is an exploration of steps to produce creative campaigns for movement of organizations, products, and services toward growth. Students will engage in a multi-platform approach for the purpose of benefiting organizations or bringing about change with an emphasis on problem solving and instilling a professional work ethic.

    Prerequisites: COM 206 COM 247 COM 315 .   
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 451 - Communication Field Internship

    (3-6) Field experience in applied communication. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating careers in the communication field.

    Prerequisites: COM 103  and junior or senior status.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 452 - Communication Research Internship

    (3-6) Research experience in designing and implementing a research study. Students will analyze the results of their study and write a formal research report. Professional presentation of the study will be encouraged. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating graduate studies and needing academic presentation and publication experience.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 , COM 325 , and junior or senior status.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
     
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 455 - Rhetoric and Power

    (4) This interdisciplinary great books course examines the elements of the art of rhetoric, some of the arguments for and against its use, and some of its greatest examples. Students will use this knowledge to develop their rhetorical skills.

    Prerequisites: Augustine Honors students only.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 460 - Rhetorical Criticism

    (3) Offers a look at the nature of persuasive communication including strategies, applications, techniques, and the use of propaganda, persuasive message construction, and audience adaptation are also examined.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 470 - Senior Thesis

    (3) The Senior Thesis is a substantial body of work that may be research, expository, critical or creative work. It is original in subject matter, organization, or view. An interested student should begin discussions with a thesis advisor in the semester or summer before enrolling. The thesis typically will begin in the fall semester of the senior year and be completed in the following spring semester. Credits are awarded in the semester in which the thesis is completed.

    Prerequisites: Seniors within the major, 3.5 GPA (minimum cumulative), and thesis advisor permission.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by school.
  •  

    COM 475 - Senior Seminar: Innovation, Creativity, and Change

    (3) This capstone course explores the antecedents, processes, and constraints of creativity, and how creativity is cultivated for innovation, especially applied to the field of strategic communication. In addition, students will assemble a portfolio of their strategic communication work, and explore vocation and work, job searching, finances, and relationships, helping them transition from college to professional work life.

    Prerequisites: COM 206 ; Senior standing. 
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 480 - Senior Seminar

    (3) In this course, students reflect upon their educational journey and develop integrated articulations and reflections on their academic and professional preparation, culminating in a final paper and/or portfolio. In addition, students apply biblical and communication principles related to vocation and work, job searching, finances, and relationships, helping students transition from college to professional work life.

    Prerequisites: Senior majors only.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    COM 485 - Advanced Interpersonal Relations

    (3) Examination of a variety of communication variables related to issues of human interaction. Course content includes a discussion of the application of theory and faith to personal and professional relationships.

    Prerequisites: COM 210 , Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    COM 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Prerequisites: COM 103 .
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    COM 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Prerequisites: Communication major at sophomore level or above and permission of the instructor.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.

Computer Information Systems

  •  

    CIS 101 - Business Applications in Technology

    (3) A look at the history and use of the personal computer, with an emphasis upon current Microsoft products including MS Office. Students will gain skills in word processing, spreadsheet management, database management, web design, and presentation graphics. An emphasis will be placed on the use of technology in Business. A mastery of the materials and skills taught in this course is essential for success in most of the other courses in the School of Business and Leadership because the tools taught in this course are used extensively in the other courses.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    CIS 130 - Programming Foundations I

    (3) Programming teaches people logical thought progression. In this course students learn how to organize a problem into a series of steps and then write code in Python for a computer to implement the steps. Some of the modern software programming principles studied include object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, prototyping, testing, and the implementation of event-driven logic to solve real-world problems.

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CIS 137 - Web Design Fundamentals

    (3) A company’s website serves as the front door for customers. The site’s appeal, ease of use, and quality of interaction will determine profits. This course covers the computer languages of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, allowing students to produce web pages that can be intuitively understood by users. Students learn to design with many forms of data, including hypertext, graphics, audio, and video to create superior interactive web pages.

    Prerequisites: CIS 130 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CIS 230 - Programming Foundations II

    (3) This course provides more in-depth instruction in an object-oriented programming language, to include program specification, design, development, prototyping, testing, implementation, and documentation. Students learn to use the structure of modern Internet-based programs to write multi-threaded real-time applications.

    Prerequisites: CIS 130 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CIS 236 - Data Communications and Network Management

    (3) The Internet is the town square for tomorrow’s global village, and modernity is only made possible through wires, fibers, and protocols of data networks. In this course students learn the underlying principles of how information systems use telecommunications services. Students learn to create efficient and secure networks for voice, data, and video services. Specific topics addressed include the principles, protocols, methods, and standards of telecommunications, voice, and data communications concepts, networking, system configuration, and information security.

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CIS 326 - Database Administration and Implementation

    (3) Modern society uses databases to hold back chaos; without them, everything from debit cards to cell phones would fail. In this course students learn about the tools and techniques of relational database analysis and design using structured query language (SQL). Students put their skills into practice by analyzing business scenarios and then designing and implementing database solutions to include web-based data access.

    Prerequisites: CIS 130 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CIS 330 - Advanced Programming

    (3) If you give someone a program, you might frustrate them for a day, but if you teach someone to program well, they will benefit for a lifetime. This course brings together programming, web design, and database management. Topics studied include object-oriented programming, computer languages, development tools, client-server-based software, interactive web pages, and database design. The result is students who are ready for employment with the ability to create their own online stores.

    Prerequisites: CIS 137 CIS 230 , CIS 326 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CIS 447 - Advanced Database Administration and Implementation

    (3) This course focuses on how to manage a database, covering all of the concepts necessary to design and implement database systems, including logical and physical file organization, data models, data integrity, and file security. Students also learn about the transition of legacy systems to modern databases, decision support systems, and data mining. A final project includes implementing and managing a data warehouse based on real-world business information.

    Prerequisites: CIS 326 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CIS 495 - Programming and Design Capstone

    (3) Computers solve problems, many of which did not exist before computers. In this course students work in teams on self-selected projects that are approved by the professor. They learn to conceptualize problems, develop and code solutions, and then present their projects orally and in written reports. Final projects are expected to be of sufficient originality and quality to impress future employers. This is the capstone course for CIS, and can only be taken by seniors.

    Prerequisites: CIS 330 . Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CIS 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) While technology may not replace teachers, teachers who use technology are replacing those who do not. The Teaching Assistantship affords students an opportunity to give back by investing in other students and to learn more in-depth as they instruct others. Assistantship includes supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring students, classroom and laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.  

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.

Criminal Justice

  •  

    CRJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    (3) A survey of the criminal justice system in the United States including a description of its social and political institutions and an overview of the major issues in the field from a distinctly Christian worldview.  

    Prerequisites: Criminal Justice majors only.
    Corequisites: CRJ 225A CRJ 430A .  

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CRJ 201 - Philosophies of Criminal Justice

    (3) This course affords the student a substantive understanding of how the criminal justice system is connected to its natural biblical foundations, and explore distinctly biblical perspectives of justice through a Christian worldview.   

    Prerequisites: CRJ 101 CRJ 225A CRJ 430A . Criminal Justice majors only.
    Corequisites: CRJ 310A CRJ 320A 

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CRJ 250 - Criminal Justice Colloquium

    (1) The research colloquium consists of weekly talks by a variety of speakers including faculty, students, and guests on topics related to Criminal Justice. Student evaluation is based on attendance as well as an online journal with reflections on each of the presentations in regard to the student’s future in the field of criminal justice.

    Prerequisites: Criminal Justice majors only.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CRJ 301 - Criminal Law and Procedure

    (3) This course focuses on the general classification of criminal offenses, burdens and degrees of proof, jurisdiction and venue, limitations to criminal prosecution, requirements for criminal liability, culpable mental states, defenses to criminal liability, and elements of criminal offenses.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 201 . Criminal Justice majors only.
    Corequisites: CRJ 330A CRJ 480A 

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CRJ 401 - Ethics and Philosophy of Criminal Justice

    (3) This course examines the criminal justice system from an ethical perspective, comparing and contrasting teleological and deontological ethical systems and how they affect decision making in the criminal justice system.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 301 . Senior Criminal Justice majors only. 
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CRJ 455 - Practicum in Criminal Justice

    (3) This course is designed to place the student with a criminal justice activity for a firsthand look at how the agency functions. Supervision is provided by the agency and department. Each student is vetted by the particular criminal justice system agency to determine fitness for placement with that agency. Vetting includes such things as interviews, a criminal history checks, polygraph exams, and the like. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating careers in the Criminal Justice field.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 201 . Senior Criminal Justice majors only. 
    Corequisites: CRJ 401 

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    CRJ 472 - Seminar in Criminal Justice

    (3) The course is designed to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the criminal justice system by examining the more intricate details of selected criminal justice issues. It provides a variety of criminal justice topics for analysis and discussion.

    Prerequisites: CRJ 201 . Senior Criminal Justice majors only.
    Corequisites: CRJ 401 CRJ 455 .  

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

  •  

    CLD 205 - Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    (3) This course focuses on theories, concepts, research and pedagogical techniques related to culturally-responsive teaching, English language learning, language and content acquisition, teacher-student relationships, and building school-community partnerships with culturally diverse populations.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    CLD 300 - Foundations of English Language Education

    (3) This course provides an overview of historical, cultural, legal, sociolinguistic, and political contexts of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse learners in diverse school settings. Content also includes the study of the origins of the English language, grammatical structures, dialects, and connection of heritage language to learning English. Familial influences and communication issues are also explored.

    Prerequisites: CLD 205 
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    CLD 305 - Foundations in CLD Education

    (3) This course focuses on the historical, social, multi-cultural, legal, and political aspects related to the K-12 education of culturally and linguistically diverse students in the United States, including an emphasis on the connection between culture and learning, cross-cultural communication and family/community involvement.

    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    CLD 425 - First and Second Language Acquisition

    (3) This course focuses on how students acquire language (first and second language acquisition) and how language acquisition theory can help support language learner development in order to achieve academic success. 

    Prerequisites: CLD 205 .
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.

Dance

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    DNC 132 - Stage Movement/Dance

    (1) Group lessons in stage movement and dance customized to meet the needs, interests, and goals of individual students as well as those of the threatre program. Emphasis is placed on developing strong fundamentals and technique as well as improving performance and artistry.

    Notes:  May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    DNC 232 - Stage Movement/Dance II

    (1) A continuation of DNC 132  - Stage Movement/Dance for intermediate students.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or permission of the instructor.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  •  

    DNC 323 - Dance History

    (3) An overview of the history of dance and its changing role in society from ancient times to modern day. The most significant forms of western dance are traced from their global roots to their applications today, with an emphasis on the cultural, historical, and social significance of various dance forms, including social dance, ballet, modern, jazz, and musical theatre.

    When Offered
    Every even spring semester.
  •  

    DNC 351 - Intermediate Jazz Dance

    (1) Designed for students with an elementary knowledge of jazz concepts and vocabulary (either from DNC 132  or other previous dance experience, by instructor permission), this course explores various elements of jazz dance at an intermediate level, including vocabulary, technique, concepts, and important figures and pieces from jazz dance history.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 , or instructor permission.
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    Fee
    Course fee applies.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    DNC 352 - Intermediate Tap Dance

    (1) Accessible for both beginning students and those with previous dance experience, this intermediate-level course explores various elements of tap dance, including vocabulary, technique, concepts, and important figures and pieces from tap dance history. A strong emphasis on choreography and repertoire to develop students’ performance ability, especially for musical theatre applications.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 , or instructor permission. 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    Fee
    Course fee applies.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    DNC 353 - Contemporary Dance

    (1) Designed for students with previous dance experience to continue to develop their athleticism and creative voice through the medium of contemporary dance. Explores contemporary dance forms that include Afro-modern, floor work, inversions, classical modern, and improvisation. Classwork focuses on developing students’ alignment, strength, flexibility, proprioception, and rhythm. 

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 , or instructor permission. 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    Fee
    Course fee applies.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    DNC 354 - Choreography and Improvisation

    (1) This course is a study and exploration of principles of choreography and dance design. The course focuses on developing choreographic principles and devices, building upon body, space, time, energy, and relationship as the core conceptual elements of choreography. Improvisation as a choreographic tool is also explored, as well as improvisational concepts and practices that enhance and further develop choreographic skills.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 , or instructor permission. 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    Fee
    Course fee applies.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  •  

    DNC 401 - Advanced Ballet

    (2) One-on-one intensive study in ballet for advanced students. The focus in the private lessons is two-fold: to address personal weaknesses and further develop personal strengths while continuing to grow a comprehensive knowledge and ability. Additional aspects of dance explored in the course may include audition techniques, audition portfolio development, and choreography skills.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 ; or instructor permission. 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    DNC 402 - Pointe

    (2) One-on-one intensive study in pointe for advanced students. The focus in the private lessons is two-fold: to address personal weaknesses and further develop personal strengths while continuing to grow a comprehensive knowledge and ability. Additional aspects of dance explored in the course may include audition techniques, audition portfolio development, and choreography skills.

    Prerequisites: DNC 132  or DNC 232 ; or instructor permission. 
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.

Economics

  •  

    ECO 215 - Economics

    (3) Economics is about scarcity and choice. Students in this course study how people, firms, governments, and nations interact in alternative economic systems to make choices about allocating scarce resources. In addition, students learn to evaluate these systems, understand macroeconomic monetary and fiscal policies, and engage in policy debates. 

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  •  

    ECO 222 - Principles of Economics: Microeconomics

    (3) Economics is the study of mankind in the ordinary business of life. Because the world has a scarcity of resources, the principles in this course will help students consider costs and make better, more efficient decisions. Students learn how people and businesses make choices, how markets are organized, why and how businesses behave differently, and the effects of government interventions on free markets. 

    Prerequisites: BUS 101  / MGT 101 , ECO 215 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    ECO 297 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    ECO 315 - Economic Development

    (3) In this course students learn the significance of economic and political institutions and explore macroeconomic growth strategies. Since human nature is at the heart of every economy, students explore poverty as material and spiritual are equipped to exercise compassion without compromising human dignity.  

    Prerequisites: ECO 215 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  •  

    ECO 350 - Internship

    (1 to 3) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  •  

    ECO 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    ECO 397 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    ECO 450 - Internship

    (1 to 3) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  •  

    ECO 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  •  

    ECO 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
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