Academic Catalog 2020-2021 
    
    Dec 03, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All CCU Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. In general, undergraduate course numbers (i.e. 100-499) ending in “A” are offered in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies. Undergraduate course numbers without the “A” ending are offered in the College of Undergraduate Studies.

 
  
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    CUL 330A - Studies in Secularism: Understanding the Spiritual Landscape

    (3) This current issue course explores the rapidly expanding secular influence upon Western society. It discusses the underlying reasons for this shift and offers approaches on how to respond effectively to such trends.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 332A - Christian Truth vs. Skeptical Culture: Confronting the Claims of Atheism

    (3) This course studies the key issues that divide Christianity and skeptical culture, and confronts the claims of atheist thought. It focuses upon contemporary 21st-century issues.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 334A - Conflicts in Culture: Addressing Controversies with Love and Truth

    (3) This course examines a number of the key flashpoints within the contemporary “Culture Wars” that currently divide people. It discusses a variety of ways the message of the Gospel and Christians may seek to remedy these issues, such as gender issues, sex, abortion, and other key issues.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 436A - Social Action and Evangelism

    (3) This course examines and discusses the role of social action and evangelism as an essential principle of outreach and ministry.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 438A - The Works and Apologetics of C. S. Lewis

    (3) This course reviews and assesses the work of C. S. Lewis, his literature, and unique approach to cultural engagement and apologetics.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 440A - Apologetics and the Arts: Film, Music, the Visual Arts, and Social Media

    (3) This course examines the role of the arts in apologetics. It discusses and assesses the historic and contemporary impact and uses of these modes of expression to convey Christian truth.

    Prerequisites: APL 100A 
  
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    CUL 530 - Secularism and Modern Society: Understanding the Spiritual Landscape

    (3) This course assesses the secular influences in our society, noting particularly the underlying spiritual, philosophical, and cultural reasons that perpetuate this influence.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
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    CUL 532 - Truth and Skepticism: The Case Against Atheism

    (3) This course explores the key issues that contrast Christianity and skeptical culture, and explores the core pillars of atheism. It focuses on contemporary 21st-century issues.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
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    CUL 534 - Contemporary Conflicts and Christian Response

    (3) This course focuses on the contemporary “Culture Wars” issues that divide people. It equips students to integrate ways Christians can address and resolve these issues, tackling topics such as gender issues, sexual issues, and abortion.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
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    CUL 536 - Advanced Social Action and Evangelism

    (3) This course assesses the current state of Christian social activism as an extension of evangelism. It equips students to plan and implement potential new strategies for effective and biblically faithful social action.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
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    CUL 538 - The Apologetics of C.S. Lewis

    (3) This course analyzes Lewis’s works by focusing on his apologetic orientation. By applying the insights of Lewis to their own context and culture, students are able to describe their own worldview more creatively and effectively.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
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    CUL 540 - Advanced Studies in Apologetics and the Arts: Film, Music, the Visual Arts, and Social Media

    (3) This course equips students to deploy the arts creatively and effectively in their apologetic approaches and methodologies.

    Prerequisites: APL 500 
  
  
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    CYS 525 - Cyber Warfare

    (3) Cyber warfare involves the battle space use and targeting of computers and networks in warfare. It involves both offensive and defensive operations pertaining to the threat of cyber attacks, espionage, and sabotage. In this course we introduce students to the principles of cyber warfare in a military context. Students gain an understanding of how technology has impacted modern-day information warfare.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
  
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    CYS 530 - Cyber Criminology

    (3) In this course, students investigate criminology as it relates to cyber crime. This class applies the social and behavioral approaches used to study the causes and consequences of crimes that occur in cyberspace. We examine various types of computer-based criminal activity as well as the social and psychological factors that contribute to the life of cyber crime.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
  
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    CYS 535 - Digital Forensics

    (3) Introduction to digital forensics as used to analyze criminal evidence in computer systems and digital media. Forensic tools and techniques for storage and memory analysis of Windows/Linux, network traffic, documentation are covered and reinforced with hands-on exercises run in a virtual machine environment.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Virtual lab environment.
  
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    CYS 540 - Ethical Hacking and Cyber Kill Chain

    (3) Introduction to ethical hacking using the Cyber Kill Chain model (which consists of seven steps: Reconnaissance, Weaponization, Delivery, Exploit, Installation, Command and Control, and Actions on Objectives). The Cyber Kill Chain model describes the phases of a targeted cyber attack. Ethical hacking is used by cyber practitioners to find vulnerabilities before an attacker is able to exploit them.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
  
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    CYS 545 - Security Policy and Governance

    (3) Governance is the process of managing, directing, controlling, and influencing organizational decisions, actions, and behaviors. This course introduces students to the major security policies through which governance is applied through compliance audits. We cover standards in several domains to include government, health, finance, and commercial industry.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
  
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    CYS 555 - Business and Ethics of Cyber Security

    (3) Novel course on how to perform business development in the cyber security field and the nuances involved in running cyber-based business. We cover topics such as: financial issues in managing a secure operation, capture management, proposal development, contract vehicles, cyber security insurance, and more.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 .
  
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    CYS 560 - Cyber Defenses

    (3) Introduction to the principles of cyber defenses: prevention and protection; detection and management of incidents; responses and interventions. We also cover security architecture and design, intrusion detection and prevention systems, security information event management systems/log analysis, enterprise perimeter security, continuity of operations, and disaster recovery planning.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501  
    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Virtual lab environment.
  
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    CYS 565 - Malware Analysis and Vulnerability Assessment

    (3) To minimize costly security breaches, organizations need to evaluate the risk in their enterprise from an array of vulnerabilities. Once a breach has occurred, typically due to a malware infection, malware analysis should be performed to prevent breaches of a similar type. This course introduces students to the vulnerability assessment process and malware analysis.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501  
    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Virtual lab environment.
  
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    CYS 655 - Capstone - Special Topics in Cyber Security

    (3) This capstone course covers advanced topics in Cybersecurity to include: Policy & Governance, Business, Cyber Defenses & Forensics, Ethical Hacking, Warfare and Criminology. Student final research projects might explore such topics as: Global Cybersecurity, Moral/Legal Foundations of Privacy, Human Factors in INFOSEC, Healthcare INFOSEC, Data Science and Security, Computer Immunology and Critical Infrastructure Protection.

    Prerequisites: CYS 501 ; completion of or concurrent enrollment in all other program requirements.
    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Virtual lab environment.
  
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    DEN 220A - Big Data Fundamentals

    (3) This course is an introduction to big data: concepts, processes, analysis, storage, and adoption using hands on exercises and terminology in layman’s terms in order to better serve and interact with stakeholders. This course presents all aspects of big data including business intelligence, big data techniques, database selection both SQL and NoSQL for implementation of a Big Data solution.

    Prerequisites: CIT 101A 
  
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    DEN 320A - Designing Big Data Systems

    (3) This course incorporates hands-on development to produce a big data system utilizing reliability, modeling, storage, retrieval, encoding, replication, partitioning, transactions, consistency and processing. This course presents technical concepts for practitioners in the big data arena. This course is designed for students to approach solutions involving big data and its surrounding systems.

    Prerequisites: DEN 220A .
  
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    DEN 330A - Big Data Principles and Practices

    (3) This course expands on big data and introduces web scaling, data modeling, real time analytics and technologies like Hadoop, Casandra, and Storm. It introduces lambda architecture, layering, and streaming processing for end to end big data solutions. It is designed to equip students with additional techniques to address and implement solutions for big data problems and includes SQL and NoSql modeling.

    Prerequisites: DEN 320A .
  
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    DEN 430A - Incorporating Data Science and Hadoop

    (3) This course teaches data science and Hadoop. Data science is the art and science of retrieving usable information out of extremely large databases. Hadoop is an open-source software for reliable, scalable, distributed computing that is associated with clusters. Students work with Hadoop using the concepts of data science to retrieve practical, useful information in support of organizational decision-making.

    Prerequisites: DEN 330A .
  
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    EAG 491A - Organizational Management - Enterprise Agility Capstone

    (3) This capstone will provide students with the opportunity to apply the tools and theories covered with a specific emphasis in the field of enterprise agility. Areas of emphasis include agile fundamentals, frameworks, roles, corporate strategy in the creation of a final project. Course outcomes will emphasize knowledge in the field, professionalism, and ethics.

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A 
  
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    EAG 520 - Enterprise Agility Concepts and Project Management

    (3) This course takes a deep dive into enterprise agility concepts and application as compared to other project management frameworks. Students will compare models such as Lean, XP, Scrum and Kanban and determine the best approach for an organization within its competitive landscape.

  
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    EAG 560 - Enterprise Agility in Practice

    (3) This course introduces students to the practice of enterprise agility in a business environment. Students will increase their knowledge of Agile frameworks and roles through hands-on experimentation and biblical concepts.

  
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    EAG 610 - Enterprise Agility and Corporate Strategy

    (3) This course takes the fundamentals of enterprise agility and applies these concepts at the corporate level. Students will learn how to take the agile principles (e.g. rapid system development life cycles) and apply them synergistically to the strategic operations of all the departments in an organization.

  
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    ECE 201A - Teaching as a Profession

    (3) This course is an introduction to the teaching profession, the function of public and private schools, and the meaning of being a teacher. It explores child growth and development, developmentally appropriate practices, family and community relationships, the responsibilities of professional educators, and personal philosophies of education.

     

  
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    ECE 205A - Health, Safety and Nutrition for ECE

    (3) This course studies the components of an appropriate school health program and the role of the early childhood educator. In addition, it focuses on the ability to create, select, and evaluate developmentally and functionally appropriate health materials, methods, equipment and environments. Emphasis is placed on integrating school, family, and community resources to insure sound health promotion for early childhood education.

  
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    ECE 216A - Human Resources for ECE

    (3) The focus of this course is on the human relations component of an ECE Administrator’s responsibilities. Topics include communication, director-staff relationships, parent involvement, staff development and leadership.

    Notes: (A 10-hour practicum is included).
  
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    ECE 218A - Field I: Standards-Based Planning

    (2) This is the first of two field experiences that provide candidates the opportunity to apply what they are learning in their program courses to a school-based setting. This course is the candidate’s introduction to field based experiences. It includes defining the context of learning through classroom observation and developing skills in selecting, teaching and evaluating learning objectives.  This course requires a minimum of 60 student contact hours in a CAGS-approved school setting. There are a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course. Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

     

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A .
    Fee
    Course fees apply.

  
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    ECE 226A - Administration of ECE

    (3) This course examines Colorado’s minimal licensing requirements, as well as optimal standards pertaining to the operation of programs for young children. It includes a focus on the human relations component of an early childhood professional’s responsibilities. Course content focuses on new directors’ administrative skills and administration from a teacher’s perspective. Legislation, standards, program planning and practical aspects of financing, administration, supervision, and management are explored.

    Notes: (A 10-hour practicum is included).
  
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    ECE 316A - Math and Science Methods

    (3) Students research and evaluate developmentally appropriate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to early childhood students. This includes designing appropriate instructional materials; identifying strategies for presenting math and science concepts and processes; effective use of technology; utilizing Colorado Math and Science Standards to develop strategic math and science instruction.

    Prerequisites: ECE 218A  
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  
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    ECE 324A - Literacy Methods

    (3) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in students (Birth to 8). Includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on academic and affective readiness; implementing assessment models.

    Corequisites: ECE 414A 

  
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    ECE 337A - Social Studies and Creative Arts Methods

    (3) Students plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to students (birth to 8). This includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials and learning experiences appropriate for students (birth to 8).

    Prerequisites: ECE 218A 
  
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    ECE 341A - Assessment and Measurement

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated.

  
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    ECE 401A - Classroom and Instructional Management

    (3) This course explores appropriate and developmentally sensitive strategies for managing behavior in typically and atypically developing early childhood students. Includes appropriate instructional management strategies; appropriate responses to the intellectual, emotional and social needs of each learner; models for guiding and managing student behavior; identifying strategies for the development of intrinsic motivation; strategies for enhancing pro-social behavior.

  
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    ECE 403A - Special Needs Methods

    (3) This course helps early childhood educators develop teaching strategies to provide an appropriate education for children with special needs. It includes applying knowledge of child development; assessment procedures of special needs children; educational interventions and communication strategies with special needs students; understanding educational or behavioral adaptations for exceptional children; and understanding the “inclusion” model for educating special needs students.

     

    Corequisites: ECE 414A 

  
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    ECE 414A - Field II: Strategic Instruction

    (2) This course focuses on strategic instructional methods and effective techniques for teaching children in diverse early childhood settings. This includes standards-based lesson plans; evidence-based curriculum design and field-proven instructional methods.  The course explores the influence of government agencies; role of the local school and school district in establishing culture and protocols; and the history and mission of Christian education as they each relate to philosophies of education. This course includes a minimum of 70 contact hours in a CAGS-approved school setting. There are a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

     

    Prerequisites: ECE 218A .
    Notes: Under certain circumstances and at the discretion of the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction Education, students may be required to retake ECE 414A based on prior academic performance and/or the length of time since completing the first attempt. No student may retake ECE 414A more than one additional time.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.

  
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    ECE 480A - Student Teaching

    (9) This course is a professional internship where ECE candidates invest the remainder of the 800 required practicum clock hours for Colorado licensure in a CAGS-approved school setting.  Under the guidance, support and observation of a CCU CAGS university field coach and a licensed classroom cooperating teacher, candidates are gradually released into full responsibility of a classroom of learners. There are a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

     

    Prerequisites: ECE 414A .
    Fee
    Fees apply.

  
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    ECE 497A - Student Teaching Seminar

    (2) This seminar offers the opportunity to conduct ongoing reflection on the teaching internship and group discussions of methods for improving as a teacher. This includes effective classroom management, assessment driven instruction, positive learning environments, and sensitive diversity issues in the modern public school environment.  It is a live (synchronous webinar as necessary for online students) class and is critical to the successful launch of the Student Teaching experience.

    Prerequisites: ECE 414A 
    Notes: This seminar is graded Pass/Fail.
  
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    ECO 215 - Economics

    (3) What everyone needs to know about how the economy works.

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ECO 220A - Introduction to Economics

    (3) This course is designed to provide the adult learner with the scope and structure of economic principles and their effect on the business enterprise. The distinction between macroeconomics and microeconomics, their relationship to each other and their combined effect on the business sector will be the focus of the course. The adult learner is expected to develop an understanding of the various economic systems, their differences, and the basic elements of a free market economy and the determination of price in a free market economy.

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A .
  
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    ECO 221A - History of Economic Thought

    (3) This foundational course in the history of economic reasoning begins with a look at biblical/ancient economic systems, moves quickly through medieval times and then into the Early Modern Era and the Industrial Revolution with its impact on capitalism. Classical, Neoclassical, and Keynesian thinking as well as newer theories round out the course.

    Prerequisites: ECO 220A 
  
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    ECO 222 - Principles of Economics: Microeconomics

    (3) Fundamental principles of microeconomics. General view of the price system, the behavior of different market types within a market economy, resource allocation, and other topics at the discretion of the instructor.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101  / MGT 101 , ECO 215 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ECO 225A - Healthcare Economics

    (3) This course introduces the student to healthcare economics within the changing healthcare environment. Legislative initiatives and financial implications that impact healthcare organizations are examined with focus on stewardship of resources. Issues related to efficiency, effectiveness, value and behavior in production and consumption of health and healthcare are analyzed within a Biblical perspective.

    Prerequisites:  ENG 103A INT 211A .
  
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    ECO 297 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 305A - Principles of Microeconomics

    (3) This foundational course in Microeconomic Theory explores the market system as the basis for capitalism. Specific topics include the interaction of supply and demand, market equilibrium, cost analysis, labor markets, and the theories of production and distribution. The role of consumers and businesses in our dynamic economy is the context for this course.

    Prerequisites: ECO 220A MAT 120A , MAT 141A .   
  
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    ECO 306A - Principles of Macroeconomics

    (3) This foundational course in macroeconomic theory explores the role of the government in the stabilization of the macroeconomy. Specific topics include unemployment, inflation, economic growth, gross domestic product, national income accounts, the business cycle, and the Federal Reserve system. Special focus is on monetary and fiscal policy strategy to stabilize our national economy.

    Prerequisites: ECO 305A .  
  
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    ECO 315 - Economic Development

    (3) In the context of God’s mission in the world, students: explore post-WWII macroeconomic growth strategies, with a focus in market-led and hybrid approaches, both urban and rural, and including the various stakeholders (government, private sector, NGO’s, citizenry); analyze the various barriers to economic growth and develop effective solution strategies to the resulting poverties; explain and apply the Christian microenterprise and microfinance tool-kit as an important strategy in poverty alleviation.

    Prerequisites: ECO 215 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ECO 350 - Internship

    (1 to 3) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ECO 357A - Introduction to Applied Econometrics

    (3) This course introduces the use of modern statistical techniques that are used in the economic arena. Statistics is used to explain economic relationships, solve economic problems and forecast future economic conditions. This is a quantitative course which assumes the student is competent with statistics to be able to apply the thinking to economics reasoning.

    Prerequisites: ECO 305A MAT 120A MAT 250A .    
  
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    ECO 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 395A - Directed Study in Economics

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ECO 397 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 401A - Money and Banking

    (3) This Money and Banking course follows Principles of Macroeconomics to take a closer look at the flow of money and capital in our domestic economy. The course looks at the interrelationship between commercial and central banking, the role of the Federal Reserve Bank, regulation, the strategy of domestic monetary policy, and our monetary policy in the international arena.

    Prerequisites: ECO 306A 
  
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    ECO 450 - Internship

    (1 to 3) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ECO 457A - Big Data and Quantitative Analysis

    (3) In this course, students learn to understand and analyze big data in order to solve economic and social programs. In the business arena, the combination of economic theory with big data provides tools to make financially optimal decisions in light of the constraints imposed by the available information. Students survey the many uses of big data in the field of economics.

    Prerequisites: ECO 306A 
  
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    ECO 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 495A - Directed Study in Economics

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ECO 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ECO 500 - Economic Analysis and Policy

    (3) Economics is the study of how individuals, governments, firms and nations make choices about allocating scarce resources to satisfy their unlimited wants. This course will challenge you to think about the consequences of the choices you and others make. You will be introduced to microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy.

    Prerequisites: ECO 215 , Juniors and Seniors only.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ECO 500 - Micro-Economic Analysis and Policy

    (3) Economics is the study of how individuals, governments, firms and nations make choices about allocating scarce resources to satisfy their unlimited wants. This course will challenge you to think about the consequences of the choices you and others make. You will be introduced to microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy.

    Prerequisites: ECO 215 ; Juniors and Seniors only. 
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ECO 502 - Financial Institutions and Monetary Policy

    (3) This course will cover concepts of business finance, corporate global treasury operations, financial institution issues, financial instrument uses and valuations, along with risk-return concepts, and risk hedging with derivative securities, plus recent problems concerning how financial abuses may have impacted the U.S. and global economies with the Great Recession.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 LAW 303 ; Juniors or Seniors only.  
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
    Cross-listed FIN 502 
  
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    ECO 502 - Financial Institutions and Monetary Policy

    (3) This course will cover concepts of business finance, corporate global treasury operations, financial institution issues, financial instrument uses and valuations, along with risk-return concepts, and risk hedging with derivative securities, plus recent problems concerning how financial abuses may have impacted the U.S. and global economies with the Great Recession.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 , LAW 303 ; Juniors or Seniors only.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
    Cross-listed FIN 502 .
  
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    ECO 505 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    (3) This is an advanced microeconomic theory course, frequently also called managerial economics, that applies economic tools to financial decision making in business and non-profit organizations. Specific topics include price and distribution theory, demand analysis, costs of production, and price and quantity determination in various market structures. This course integrates financial concepts into the economic analysis of real-world decisions.

    Prerequisites: ECO 305A MAT 341A .  
  
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    ECO 506 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    (3) This course is an intermediate theory course in the study of macroeconomics. Specific topics include the stabilization of the domestic economy through fiscal and monetary policy, the impact of domestic policy on global economic relations, national income accounting, the business cycle’s impact on business strategy, economic growth and inequality, and the role of government in our economy.

    Prerequisites: ECO 306A MAT 341A 
  
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    ECO 557 - Econometrics

    (3) This course in econometrics is based on quantitative analysis of various economic phenomena. Students will apply the models of econometrics to real world examples, giving the quantitative models empirical context. Econometric models will be used to solve economic problems, explain economic relationships, and forecast future economic events.

    Prerequisites: ECO 506 MAT 341A .  
  
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    ECO 565 - Economic Development

    (3) This course studies the economic characteristics of developing countries, the different models of economic development, the obstacles to economic development, and the policy and planning that it takes to make economic development happen. Students also look closely at poverty from a Biblical worldview, and respond to the Biblical command to care for the least advantaged.

    Prerequisites: ECO 305A 
  
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    ECO 579 - International Political Economy

    (3) In this course, students study the interrelationship between the economic and political factors that impact differing socioeconomic systems as well as the different sectors or groups within a society. International Political Economy looks at the neoclassical theories used to address issues in our capitalist economic system as well as the socioeconomic systems that differ from ours.

    Prerequisites: ECO 306A 
  
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    ECO 601 - Economic Analysis and Policy

    (3) This course is designed to examine the impact of macroeconomic influences. Determinants of trade balances, inflation and employment rates, and monetary/fiscal policy in economic growth are assessed. Attention is given to descriptive and normative aspects of economic structure and growth within the context of bi-national and multi-national agreements.

  
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    ECO 610 - International Trade and Globalization

    (3) This course surveys both the neoclassical and the new trade theory arguments for open economies and free trade in a global capitalist system. Students become familiar with the debate between free trade and protectionism, and are able to critically analyze the current trade policies in this country. Trade policies are applied to countries at various levels of development.

    Prerequisites: ECO 505 ECO 506 .  
  
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    ECO 620 - International Finance

    (3) In this course, students study theories of international economics to explore the international monetary system, open economy macroeconomics, and international financial stability. Specific topics include Balance of Payments (BOP), Balance of Trade (BOT), Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), contagion theory, exchange rate models and government involvement in currency value determination. Current policies in international finance are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: ECO 505 ECO 506 .  
  
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    ECO 630 - Applied Math for Economics

    (3) This course looks at the foundation of economic theory from a mathematical perspective. Topics include economic modeling and statistics as well as the parts of integral calculus, multivariate calculus, and linear algebra specifically applied to economic reasoning. This course in applied mathematics uses the theoretical math the students have taken in the Math Core or the equivalent.

    Prerequisites: ECO 557 MAT 341A .  
  
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    ECO 695 - Research Seminar in Globalization, Economic Development, and International Trade

    (3) In this course, students go deeply into the applications and impact of economic policy decisions on countries, organizations and people. Students have the opportunity to choose a specific research topic in the areas of globalization, economic development, and/or international trade and are expected to include the biblical worldview of our relationships with others in the world.

    Prerequisites: ECO 565 ECO 610 .  
  
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    ECO 699 - M.S. Economics Capstone

    (3) In this Capstone course, students design a comprehensive project for a specific organization using the tools of economics learned in the M.S. Economics. Students prepare a multimedia presentation of their Capstone Project for their host organization and their peers.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all other M.S. Economics program requirements.
  
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    EDU 125 - College Geometry for Secondary Education

    (3) This course focuses on modem geometry, Euclidean geometry, trigonometry and geometric transformations. Students develop content proficiency through diverse course activities and use of mathematic software. Students also engage in mathematical problem solving through application of concepts to real-world situations.

    When Offered
    Odd spring semesters.
    Cross-listed MAT 125 .
  
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    EDU 150 - Boston Trip: History of American K-12 Education

    (2) Students from diverse majors spend four days in Boston focused on the history of American K-12 education - beginning in the colonial period spanning up to present day. The progression of educational philosophies, policies, cultural aspects and instructional methodologies will also be explored, hosted by premier experts in the field. Students attend a limited number of campus seminars to enhance the primary field component of this course.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing at time of enrollment; School of Education majors given priority.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
  •  

    EDU 201A - Teaching as a Profession

    (3) This course is an introduction to the teaching profession, the function of public and private schools, and the meaning of being a teacher. It includes exploration of child growth and development, developmentally appropriate practices, family and community relationships, the responsibilities of professional educators, and personal philosophies of education.

     

  
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    EDU 214 - Field 1 Theory and Practice in Elementary Education

    (3) Field 1 is the first of a four-semester, professional field-based experience within a CCU partnership school. The focus is on educational theory, as well as the development and implementation of standards-based lessons under university and school-based teacher supervision. Teacher candidates complete hours toward the clinical program hour minimum in addition to on-campus seminars.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 215 - Field 1 Theory and Practice in Secondary Education

    (3) Field 1 is the first of a four-semester, professional field-based experience within a CCU partnership secondary school. The focus is on education theory, as well as the development and implementation of standards-based lessons under university and school-based teacher supervision. Teacher candidates complete hours toward the clinical program hour minimum in addition to on-campus seminars.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semester.
  
  •  

    EDU 218A - Field I: Standards-Based Planning

    (2) This is the first of two field experiences that provide candidates the opportunity to apply what they are learning in their program courses to a school-based setting. This course is the candidate’s introduction to the teaching profession. It includes defining the context of learning through classroom observation and developing skills in selecting, teaching and evaluating learning of objectives.  This course requires a minimum of 60 student contact hours in a CAGS-approved elementary school setting. There are a limited number of synchronous activities in this course.

     

    Prerequisites: ENG 103A .
    Fee
    Course fees apply.

  
  •  

    EDU 230 - Educational Technology

    (2) Integration of technology into all aspects of teaching and learning to include instructional planning and delivery, grading, communication, assessment data analyses, student research, and class assignments. Review of current software, hardware, and multimedia used by local school districts. Includes Internet/Intranet, PowerPoint and portfolio development.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing (30+ credit hours).
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 250 - Field 2 Elementary Classroom and Behavior Management

    (3) Field 2 is the second of a four-semester, professional field-based experience within a CCU partnership school. The focus is on implementation of research-based methods related to classroom and behavior management under university and school-based teacher supervision. Teacher candidates complete hours toward the required clinical program hour minimum in addition to on-campus seminars.

    Prerequisites: EDU 214  or SPD 213 ; Sophomore standing. School of Education major or minor students only.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 260 - Field 2 Secondary Classroom and Behavior Management

    (3) Field 2 is the second of a four-semester, professional field-based experience within a CCU partnership school. The focus is on implementation of research-based methods related to classroom and behavior management under university and school-based teacher supervision.  Teacher candidates complete hours toward the required clinical program hour minimum in addition to on-campus seminars.

    Prerequisites: EDU 215  or SPD 213 . School of Education major or minor students only.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 300 - Education Research Seminar

    (1) This course teaches students in education basic concepts in conducting and interpreting education research including the nature of inquiry, quantitative and qualitative research, statistics, and presentation/dissemination of findings. Since many educators eventually complete a graduate degree, this seminar prepares them for advanced study.

    Prerequisites: School of Education major or minor students only.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by school.
  
  •  

    EDU 314 - Curriculum: Mathematics/Science

    (3) Concepts, methods, techniques, and materials necessary to effectively teach mathematics and science to K-6 students. Emphasis on integration of curriculum, Colorado Academic Standards, and classroom applications.

    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
  •  

    EDU 315 - Historical Foundations of Mathematics in Education

    (3) This course focuses on the historical and philosophical foundations of mathematics and mathematics education. In addition to a comprehensive introduction to the history of mathematics, topics will also include a review of common historical and present-day mathematical tools, as well as current ethical considerations related to mathematics in society.

    When Offered
    Even spring semesters.
    Cross-listed MAT 315 .
  
  •  

    EDU 316A - Math and Science Methods

    (3) Candidates research and evaluate developmentally appropriate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to elementary students. This includes designing appropriate instructional materials; identifying strategies for presenting math and science concepts and processes; effective use of technology; utilizing Colorado Math and Science Standards to develop strategic math and science instruction.

    Prerequisites: EDU 218A  or SED 218A 
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  
  •  

    EDU 324A - Literacy Methods

    (3) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in elementary students. It includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on academic and affective readiness; and implementing assessment models.

     

    Corequisites: EDU 414A  or SED 414A 

  
  •  

    EDU 334 - Teaching Science and Social Studies in the Elementary Classroom

    (3) This course focuses on the instructional methods, curriculum and assessments necessary to effectively teach social studies and science to K-6 students. Emphasis is on the integration of curriculum, Colorado Academic Standards, and effective, research-based teaching practices in science and social studies. Teacher Candidates complete the clinical practice requirements of this course, concurrently, during their EDU 461 Field 3 school placement.

    Prerequisites: EDU 250 .
    Corequisites: EDU 461 .

    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 337A - Social Studies and Creative Arts Methods

    (3) Candidates plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to an elementary audience. This includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials and learning experiences appropriate for elementary students.

    Prerequisites: EDU 218A 
  
  •  

    EDU 340 - Assessment and Action Research

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional decision-making process is explored, with an emphasis on practical application to student learning outcomes, and increasing achievement for students from diverse backgrounds. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, protocolos, and other assessment practices will be analyzed. 

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
  •  

    EDU 341A - Assessment and Measurement

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated.

  
  •  

    EDU 342 - Instructional Models, Pedagogies, and Learning Management

    (2) A course devoted to successful instructional models and pedagogies for standards based instruction in a continuous cycle of student learning through the collaborative design of individual instruction/intervention, grounded in research, assessment data, and accountability to achieve content mastery-learning of knowledge and skills with the embedded abilities of reflection and critical thought.

    Prerequisites: Music education majors only.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
  •  

    EDU 401A - Classroom and Instructional Management

    (3) This course explores appropriate and developmentally sensitive strategies for managing behavior in typically and atypically developing elementary children. It includes appropriate instructional management strategies; appropriate responses to the intellectual, emotional and social needs of each learner; models for guiding and managing student behavior; identifying strategies for the development of intrinsic motivation; strategies for enhancing pro-social behavior.

     

 

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