Academic Catalog 2018-2019 
    
    Sep 24, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All CCU Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. In general, undergraduate course numbers (i.e. 100-499) ending in “A” are offered in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies. Undergraduate course numbers without the “A” ending are offered in the College of Undergraduate Studies.

 
  
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    HIS 211A - History of Christianity

    (3) This course surveys the history of Christianity from its beginnings through the twentieth century. It stresses the highlights of each era. The course stresses church organization and practice. Additionally, the history of theology, doctrine and spirituality, and the impact of Christianity upon society and society upon Christianity are explored.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HIS 301A - Christianity to 1517

    (3) Church history from the Apostolic Age to the Protestant Reformation; major theological and organizational traditions.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HIS 303 - American Church History

    (3) History of the Christian experience in America from the Colonial era to the present. Examination of the differences in theology and polity among the major denominations.

    When Offered
    Odd spring semesters.
  
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    HIS 303A - Christianity in America

    (3) History of the Christian experience in America from the Colonial era to the present. Examination of the differences in theology and polity among the major denominations.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HIS 304A - History of Ecclesiology/Polity

    (3) This course will examine the historical and contemporary issues of polity within the Church. Analysis of major positions in church polity, theological emphasis, and historical development provide the student the knowledge to develop his/her ability to apply theological convictions to leadership situations. The course will provide the forum in which students can begin to evaluate the differences in church polity found in Christianity relative to their place and influence in culture and society.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HIS 313 - Ancient Mediterranean World

    (3) The extraordinary transformations of the ancient Mediterranean world are examined from 2000 B.C. through the onset of the first century A.D. The ways in which the Aegean, Greek, and Roman civilizations shaped their world are examined along with their multiple contributions to the shaping of our world.

    Prerequisites: HIS 185 .
    When Offered
    Even fall semesters.
  
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    HIS 314 - Roman Empire and Medieval Europe

    (3) A study of the shaping of the western world from the first century to the fifteenth century. Special emphasis is on the development of the Christian Church during this time period.

    When Offered
    Odd spring semesters.
  
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    HIS 315 - Early Modern Europe

    (3) This course explores the individuals, events, and trends in Europe beginning with the fifteenth-century Italian Renaissance and its expansion into the rest of Europe. The Protestant Reformation and the resultant era of religious warfare are covered in detail, culminating with the Thirty Years’ War in the early seventeenth century.

    When Offered
    Odd fall semesters.
  
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    HIS 317 - Modern Europe

    (3) This course surveys the individuals, events, intellectual developments, and cultural trends influencing 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, starting with the Thirty Years’ War to the end of Victorian Britain. This course explores trends in British and continental history alike, with special emphasis given to the English Civil War, the Glorious Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution in Victorian Britain.

    When Offered
    Even spring semesters.
  
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    HIS 320A - Colorado History

    (3) A study of the development of the state of Colorado from the pre-historic era to the 20th century. Emphasis on Native Americans in Colorado, the economic and political developments, and the important personalities that shaped the state

  
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    HIS 321 - Great Issues of the 21st Century

    (3) The ideas and controversies that will determine the destiny of America and the world in the next 50 years.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
    Cross-listed SOC 321 .
  
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    HIS 321H - Great Issues of the 21st Century - Honors

    (3) The ideas and controversies that will determine the destiny of America and the world in the next 50 years.

    Prerequisites: Trustees or Presidential Scholar
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
    Cross-listed SOC 321H .
  
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    HIS 340 - The American Civil War and Reconstruction

    (3) Study of the causes, main events, and significance of the American Civil War. Emphasis on the historiography of this central event in American history.

    When Offered
    Even spring semesters.
  
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    HIS 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit. Junior standing.
  
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    HIS 360 - The American West

    (3) Concentrated study of the history of the Trans-Mississippi West. The settling and social, economic and political development of this region. Attention to the Native Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and other ethnic groups who played a significant role in the West.

    When Offered
    Odd fall semesters.
  
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    HIS 365 - Christianity and the American Founding

    (3) This course explores the role of the Christian religion in the founding and establishment of the United States of America. This course examines the role that Christianity played in forming the social, legal, and political structures of American society as well as explore in what sense America is or is not to be considered a Christian nation.

    When Offered
    Even fall semesters.
  
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    HIS 379 - London Week

    (3) This course will highlight the British contribution to the development of Western Civilization and to the political, religious, and social influence of England around the world. During the spring semester, students will meet periodically to complete pre-trip requirements. students travel to London immediately after the spring semester and spend a week there to complete the requirements for the course.

    When Offered
    Odd spring semesters.
    Cross-listed GLS 379 , POL 379 
  
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    HIS 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HIS 390A - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HIS 433A - Survey of World Religions

    (3) Study of the major world religions-Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, and Christianity-with a theological and apologetic evaluation of the main ideas from each religion. Emphasis on contemporary, descriptive study of the history, development, scriptures, beliefs, and practices of the world’s major religions.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HIS 450 - Internship

    (3-6) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    No more than 3 credit hours of an internship can be applied toward the major.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    HIS 466 - Historiography

    (3) An introduction to the art and science of historical research and writing with an emphasis on the history of historical thought, the methodology of doing history, and the philosophy of history including a Christian perspective.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.
    When Offered
    Even fall semesters.
  
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    HIS 470 - Senior Thesis

    (3) The Senior Thesis is a substantial body of work that may be research, expository, critical, or creative work. It is original in subject matter, organization, or view. An interested student should begin discussions with a thesis advisor in the semester or summer before enrolling. The thesis typically will begin in the fall semester of the senior year and be completed in the following spring semester. Credits are awarded in the semester in which the thesis is completed.

    Prerequisites: Seniors within the major, 3.5 GPA (minimum cumulative), and thesis advisor permission.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    HIS 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    HIS 490A - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HIS 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    HIS 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    HPE 110 - Varsity Women’s Golf

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 111 - Varsity Men’s Golf

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 112 - Varsity Men’s Tennis

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 113 - Varsity Men’s Soccer

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 114 - Varsity Women’s Soccer

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 115 - Varsity Men’s Basketball

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 116 - Varsity Women’s Basketball

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 117 - Varsity Women’s Volleyball

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 118 - Varsity Men’s Cross Country Running

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 119 - Varsity Women’s Cross Country Running

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 120 - Varsity Women’s Softball

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 122 - Varsity Women’s Tennis

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 125 - Varsity Baseball

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 126 - Varsity Men’s Track

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 127 - Varsity Women’s Track

    (1) Training and participation in varsity intercollegiate team sports.

    Notes: May be taken for credit only once per academic year. A maximum of 4 semester hours per sport may be counted toward graduation requirements.
  
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    HPE 240 - First Aid/CPR

    (1) American Red Cross certification course that combines CPR and first aid training to teach participants to recognize and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies in infants, children and adults; perform first aid; treat sudden illnesses; minimize the effects of shock; recognize emergencies and take action; and understand the role of AEDs in the Cardiac Chain of Survival.

  
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    HRM 310A - Human Resource Administration I

    (3) This course will provide students with a basic understanding of human resource management concepts and issues to include Equal Employment Opportunity, affirmative action, job analysis, labor planning, recruitment, selection, separation, compensation, benefit administration, HRIS, OSHA, and labor relations.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Notes: Formerly BUS 470A.
  
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    HRM 311A - Human Resource Administration II

    (3) This course is a continuation of HRM 310A , Human Resource Administration I. Course focus is on compensation, labor relations, and the emerging function of global human resource management.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A , HRM 310A .
    Notes: Formerly BUS 471A.
  
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    HRM 330A - Labor and Employment Law

    (3) This course offers an in-depth analysis of Labor and Employment Law within the context of human resource management. The following topics will be explored: employment contracts; the hiring and firing of employees; the employment-at-will doctrine; benefits; compensation; safety and security; staffing; and labor-management relations as well as emerging Federal legal issues which influence HR policies and practices within the workplace.

    Prerequisites: BUS 303A .
    Notes: Formerly BUS 423A.
  
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    HRM 340A - Workforce Planning, Staffing and Performance

    (3) This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to the ongoing cycle of strategic workforce planning. Included are such areas as: the strategic human resource requirements across the spectrum of needs for each department, job design, recruitment, placement, work studies and performance measurement.

    Prerequisites: HRM 311A , MAT 250A .
    Fee
    Society for Human Resource Management annual membership.
  
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    HRM 345A - Employee and Labor Relations

    (3) This course covers a broad range of concepts, transactions, practices, behaviors and objectives arising out of the relationship between an employer and its employees; supervisors, subordinates and co-workers. Subjects covered include equal employment opportunity, effective communication across the organization, record-keeping as required by law and practice, performance management systems, and conflict resolution processes and negotiation/bargaining techniques.

    Prerequisites: HRM 311A , MAT 250A .
    Fee
    Society for Human Resource Management annual membership.
  
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    HRM 350A - Training and Development

    (3) Employee training and ongoing development is a strategic tool for creating competitive advantage, continued growth, productivity and capacity to retain valuable employees. This course will provide methods for designing effective training and development initiatives and the means to measure results, including: effective communications, legal requirements, technology, and metrics from a multi-national and diverse global perspective.

    Prerequisites: HRM 311A , MAT 250A 
    Fee
    Society for Human Resource Management annual membership.
  
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    HRM 355A - Compensation and Benefits

    (3) This course presents an overview of the HR specialization area that comprises compensation and benefits. Included are topics such as how organizations use pay structures, benefits packages including retirement and health plans and other forms of compensation to attract and retain employees, and how these expenses have a significant impact on a company’s competitive advantage, financial position and sustainability.

    Prerequisites: HRM 311A , MAT 250A .
    Fee
    Society for Human Resource Management annual membership.
  
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    HRM 450A - Globalization, Mergers and Acquisitions, Managing Diversity

    (3) In this course, students will study human resource management practices as they apply to the changes due to globalization, mergers and acquisitions, and the impact of cultural diversity in a workforce.

    Prerequisites: HRM 310A .
    Fee
    Society for Human Resource Management annual membership.
  
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    HUM 101A - Creative Arts

    (3) This course provides an introductionto our humanity through hands-on experience in the arts (music, visual arts, poetry, story, play and dance). Aesthetic and artistic values in the broader context of human cultural development, responsibility, and joy are explored.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 114 - New Testament

    (3) Survey to acquaint the student with the content, message, and significance of the books of the New Testament.

    Fee
    Course fee may apply.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
    Cross-listed BIB 114 .
  
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    HUM 114A - New Testament

    (3) This course provides the background, content, unity and progression of the New Testament Scriptures. The student will capture an understanding of the life and ministry of Christ, the development of the Church and the unfolding of the New Covenant.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A  
    Notes: INT 200A, INT 201A, INT 212A, or PHL 215A should be taken prior to this course.
  
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    HUM 120 - Introduction to the Arts

    (3) Introduction to our humanity through hands-on experience in the arts (music, visual arts, poetry, story, play, and dance). Aesthetic and artistic values in the broader context of human cultural development, responsibility, and joy.

    Notes: This course satisfies the general education fine arts requirement for most students, and is the required fine arts course for education majors. It is recommended for all students with a general interest in the fine arts. Students with a special interest in theatre should see THR 112 . Students with a special interest in music should see MUS 110 .
    Note: HUM 120 does not satisfy the fine arts requirement for music majors or minors.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    HUM 205A - Understanding Shakespeare

    (3) Read and analyze a number of Shakespeare’s works and view its cinematic counterpart. Some of the well-known classics will include Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Othello, and Hamlet.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 210A - Oxford Writers: J.R.R. Tolkien

    (3) This course explores and evaluates the moral and philosophical issues in J.R.R. Tolkien’s work, The Lord of the Rings. In particular, the complexities of good and evil in relation to heroism are examined, discussed and evaluated.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A  
  
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    HUM 216A - Classic Christmas Films & Literature

    (3) This course provides a study of the classic Christmas film and literature genre,including popularstories such as A Christmas Carol and Miracle on 34th Street .

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 221 - Experiencing Creative Arts and Culture

    (3) A guided experience of the arts (visual, literary, theatre and music) within a selected urban cultural setting.

    Notes: Additional fees apply for travel/lodging and event tickets. Class size will be limited.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School, winter or summer semesters.
  
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    HUM 229A - C.S. Lewis in Film & Literature

    (3) Students will examine some of the major works of C. S. Lewis to see how this master storyteller and great communicator used story, and particularly metaphor, to communicate the Christian message to a secular world.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 240 - Film Appreciation and Analysis

    (3) How to watch films intelligently and for even greater enjoyment; view some of the greatest films; how to choose between a good film and a travesty; how films are made; and the impact of film on American society and history.

  
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    HUM 240A - Film Appreciation and Analysis

    (3) How to watch films intelligently and for even greater enjoyment; view some of the greatest films; how to choose between a good film and a travesty; how films are made; and the impact of film on American society and history.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 305 - Children’s Literature in Education

    (3) Use of literary materials for children from preschool through middle school (4-14 years of age). History, genres, and classroom applications.

    When Offered
    Every fall and spring semesters.
  
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    HUM 310 - Principles of Leadership

    (3) An interdisciplinary study of leadership with emphasis on principles, style, and skills; ethical and servant leadership; and leaders in the context of community and profession.

  
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    HUM 321 - Experiencing Creative Arts and Culture

    (3) A guided experience of the arts (visual, literary, theatre and music) within a selected urban cultural setting.

    Notes: This course counts as an upper-level English elective and requires an additional research assignment. Additional fees apply for travel/lodging and event tickets. Class size will be limited.
    When Offered
    (Offered during special terms.)
  
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    HUM 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HUM 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HUM 406 - Young Adult Literature and the Reader

    (3) Study of literature for young adults and adolescent protagonists in literature. Topics include strategies to promote reading literacy, bibliotherapy, multicultural voice and themes, adolescent multimedia culture, and censorship.

  
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    HUM 425A - Personal and Social Ethics

    (3) This course explores the philosophy of life, ethical theories, and values as a basis for social ethics, institutional administration, and a responsible lifestyle.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    HUM 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
  •  

    HUM 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit
  
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    HUM 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit
  
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    INT 100 - Student Success

    (1) This course is designed to introduce college students to strategies designed to enhance their academic success and personal growth. This class is required of any conditionally admitted student in the first semester of the student’s enrollment at CCU.

    Notes: Registration restricted to Conditionally Admitted students only.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    INT 101 - First-Year Integration

    (3) Think critically, grow spiritually, and change the world. Based on the premise that we as Christians are called to be rational creatures, relational creatures, and responsible creatures, FYI is an integrative study of foundational Christian principles with other disciplines. Examination and discussion of problems and contemporary issues - academic, personal, and social - facing students in their pursuit of success in college and life. Please see the First-Year Integration (FYI) page for specific information about this required course.

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    INT 102 - Transfer Student Integration

    (1) This course gives students the opportunity to learn things they need to know about themselves, things that enhance their spiritual journey and assimilate them into a Christian learning environment, things they need to learn about their own campus, and what makes CCU unique from other college campuses. This is a 5 week course to assist students transferring in 24-59 credits in the transition to Colorado Christian University.

    This course is required for students transferring in 24-45 credit hours.

    Prerequisites: Students with 24 to 45 credit hours transferred to CCU.

  
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    INT 200A - Adult Studies Seminar

    This course focuses on the strategies and tools necessary to be successful in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies degree programs. Topics include an overview of the CAGS adult learning classroom and online environments and expectations, essential writing and communication skills, integration of faith, learning and living, and financial literacy.

    Notes: Undergraduate students who have not attended a college or university for academic credit within ten years prior to admission are required to take this course.
    Course may be used to fulfill general elective requirements.
  
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    INT 201A - Adult Studies Seminar

    (6) This course focuses on the strategies and tools necessary to be successful in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies degree programs. Topics include an overview of the CAGS adult learning classroom and online environments and expectations, essential writing and communication skills, integration of biblical principles, learning and living, and financial aid literacy. Students will also learn how to minimize time and cost to degree completion using CLEP/DSST exams, and other formats to demonstrate their prior learning and experience.

    Notes: This course must be taken at CCU.
  
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    INT 202 - Integrative Seminar

    (3) Review of Christian theology and its integration with other disciplines; discussion of problems and contemporary issues. May include the formulation and defense of a personal statement of faith.

  
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    INT 211A - Adult Studies Seminar I

    (3) This course focuses on the strategies and resources necessary to be successful in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies. Topics include an overview of the CAGS adult learning philosophy and classroom, online environments and expectations, essential academic writing and communication skills, and financial aid literacy. Students will learn how to minimize time and cost to degree completion using CLEP/DSST exams and other formats to demonstrate prior learning.

    Notes: This course must be taken at CCU.
  
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    INT 212A - Adult Studies Seminar II

    (3) This course examines the distinctive Christian worldview and perspective unique to all CAGS courses. Topics include a broad overview of the Old Testament and New Testament, and a Christian worldview. Students will learn skills needed in order to integrate biblical scripture and concepts into assignments.

    Notes: This course must be taken at CCU.
  
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    INT 581 - Cultural Diversity

    (3) This is the graduate level course for the study of cultural diversity. It provides students an opportunity to study the current and historical multicultural, multiethnic diversity issues in the American society and the school system and their implications for the educational setting. The course is designed to enhance the awareness of the issues involved in cultural diversity, and guide the direction for positive proactive responses.

  
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    ISM 270A - Management of Information Systems

    (3) Study of information systems focusing on delivering value to the user and organization, and creating process efficiencies through the analysis, design, and implementation of systems.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    ISM 312A - Internet Development and eCommerce

    (3) An overview of today’s technology-based marketplace that uses electronic commerce to buy and sell products and services and to enhance business processes over the Internet. Students review current Internet languages for programming, appearance and organization of information and examine applications of marketing and business strategies, as well as legal, ethical, tax and payment issues when conducting business on the Internet.

    Prerequisites: The student should have a working knowledge of information and communication technologies, as well as have a basic understanding of project management.
    ENG 102A .
  
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    ISM 316A - Information Security

    (3) This course includes basic information goals of availability, integrity, accuracy, and confidentiality. Vocabulary and terminology specific to the field of information security are discussed. Identification of exposures and vulnerabilities and appropriate countermeasures are addressed. The importance of appropriate planning and administrative controls is also discussed. Students will implement technical information security solutions.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    ISM 330A - Information Technology Infrastructure

    (3) Covers the unique dimensions of leading information technology employees and information technology resources towards organizational goals; aligning IT infrastructure with business processes.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A , ISM 270A .
  
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    ISM 350A - Information Systems Management Internship

    (3) This internship course provides a forum for students to earn college credit for supervised fieldwork in a proposed business, nonprofit, or industry setting.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Notes: Pass/Fail. Can be retaken for credit, maximum of six credit hours may count toward the undergraduate degree. A maximum of three credit hours may count toward the major with approved course substitution.
  
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    ISM 410A - Enterprise Architecture and Knowledge Management

    (3) This course studies the need for supporting knowledge management and the technical knowledge needed to plan and manage enterprise architecture for today’s business technology and communication systems. Students will use the Zachman FrameworkTM to facilitate problem solving for businesses with emphasis on understanding Enterprise architecture and knowledge management to enable business to bring solutions to fruition in a timely manner and to recognize the speed of change.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    ISM 426A - Data and Information Management

    (3) Course provides technical and managerial skills in planning, analysis, logical design, physical design, and implementation of a database. Course topics include: database concepts; data models query languages; SQL; entity-relationship modeling, normalization, object-oriented databases, ORACLE database management, data warehousing, database integrity management (data security), database replication/synchronization; and transaction management.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A , ISM 270A , ISM 312A , ISM 440A .
  
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    ISM 440A - Systems Analysis and Design

    (3) This course is a study of management of software teams and building software using agile methodology and scrum; object-oriented and structured programming development methods, data types, operators, expressions, control flow, and input and output of a specific programming language. Additional topics include UML, use cases, and requirements generation.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  
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    ISM 464A - Software Application and Design

    (3) This course is an introduction to computing as a science, with an emphasis upon creating models of problems represented, manipulated, and solved by a computer. A programming language will be used to introduce the concepts of developing algorithms, data models, data structures, and object-oriented and structured software engineering and programming approaches and web development. The software development life cycle will be covered extensively.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A , ISM 440A .
  
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    ISM 491A - Information Systems Capstone

    (3) Students assimilate and apply previous coursework in the ISM program to a comprehensive problem in the area of management information systems.

    Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all major coursework.
  
  •  

    JBS 100 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work

    (3) Overview of professionalism in the workplace including functional processes (communication, goal setting, decision-making, networking, resume writing, interviewing) and employer expectations for success in the workplace.

    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 150 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 1

    (3) First professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 200 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 2

    (3) Second professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 250 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 3

    (3) Third professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 300 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 4

    (3) Fourth professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 350 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 5

    (3) Fifth professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 400 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 6

    (3) Sixth professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    JBS 450 - Leading Yourself in the World of Work 7

    (3) Seventh professional job experience, approved by Employment Management Services, to increase professional skill sets, integrate the student into the workplace, and connect class learning with employment experience. Student must maintain continual employment with a minimum of 225 hours per semester.

    Notes: Pass/Fail.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
    When Offered
    Fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    LAT 201 - Latin

    (3) Reading, translating, and analyzing selections of great works in Latin literature.

 

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