Academic Catalog 2008-2009 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2008-2009 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies  (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS)  (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. For those course numbers that are similar or identical, “CUS” or “CAGS” will be used to differentiate.

 

Latin American Studies Program

  
  •  

    LAS 213 - Spanish Language Study I

    (3)
    Students come to Costa Rica with varying degrees of fluency in Spanish, so the Latin America Studies Program (LASP) places them in the Spanish class that corresponds to each participant’s level of oral proficiency based on a placement exam and interview during orientation. Students study grammar, conversation, phonetics and/or literature based on the results of their tests. Classes are taught by Latin Americans, which means participants hear and learn the language the way it is spoken in Latin America. This is reinforced during everyday interaction with Spanish-speaking host families. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.

  
  •  

    LAS 214 - Spanish Language Study II

    (3)
    Students come to Costa Rica with varying degrees of fluency in Spanish, so the Latin America Studies Program (LASP) places them in the Spanish class that corresponds to each participant’s level of oral proficiency based on a placement exam and interview during orientation. Students study grammar, conversation, phonetics and/or literature based on the results of their tests. Classes are taught by Latin Americans, which means participants hear and learn the language the way it is spoken in Latin America. This is reinforced during everyday interaction with Spanish-speaking host families. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.

  
  •  

    LAS 301 - Advanced Spanish Language & Literature Seminar

    (3)
    As the foundation course for the Language and Literature concentration, this course focuses on the social, cultural, political, economic and religious issues of Latin America in the target language. Students examine how Latin Americans view their neighbors to the north and around the world through conversations, conferences and related literature. This concentration is designed to 1) Expand students’ Spanish language skills through a seminar taught exclusively in Spanish, a practicum with a Latin American organization, and the daily use of Spanish while living with a Costa Rican host family; 2) Examine Latin America through its literature, using it as a means to examine society and culture; 3) Meet and interact with prominent literary figures in the region; 4) Take part in work/service opportunities; 5) Attend local theatrical and film productions.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: LAS 350.

    Notes: Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.
  
  •  

    LAS 310 - Latin American History, Contemporary Issues and Perspectives

    (3)
    This seminar introduces the social, historical, political, economic, philosophical and theological currents that constitute Latin American society and culture. The course includes personal discussions with Latinos and field trips to various sites. This seminar is designed to introduce students to the historical development of Latin America, including selected case studies; the variety of analytical perspectives from which the Latin American reality is explained and understood; the character, past and present, of U.S. policy in the region; and the nature and influence of the economic reality in the region. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.

  
  •  

    LAS 322 - Worldview Examined and Applied Seminar

    (3)
    Designated to introduce students to several worldview perspectives within the context of Latin America and the major issues the Christian Church in Latin America confronts, including Liberation Theology. Students are challenged to reflect biblically on the above-mentioned perspectives in order to more fully develop their own Christian approach to the dilemmas of Latin America.

  
  •  

    LAS 330 - International Business Seminar

    (3)
    As the foundation for the International Business: Management and Marketing concentration, students spend an intense five weeks addressing the fundamentals and application of international business. Business concentration students are exposed firsthand to the political, social, and economic realities of Latin America and must constantly answer the question: “What should the role of a Christian person be in the face of these realities?” Throughout this concentration, students will 1) Meet Latin American business and government leaders; 2) Visit plantations, cooperatives, maquilas, and the Bolsa de Valores (the Costa Rican stock exchange); and 3) Be part of a hands-on co-requisite case study project. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica. Pre-requisite: Course background should include macro-/micro-economics and introductory-level management.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: LAS 351.

    Notes: Basic marketing and international relations or cross-cultural studies are also recommended.
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semesters Only.
  
  •  

    LAS 340 - Environmental Science Seminar

    (4)
    OFFERED SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY. As the foundation of the Environmental Science concentration, participants explore the natural sciences in a tropical setting and study their influence on the process of sustainability through this seminar and the required co-requisite field research. Students are immersed in a variety of ecosystems: dry forests, lowland rain forests, mountain cloud forests, volcanic regions, as well as beautiful reefs. Costa Rica serves as a natural laboratory. Students of the Environmental Science Concentration will 1) Aid in longitudinal research projects ranging from ecology to ecotourism; 2) Examine sustainable development and management of Costa Rica’s protected natural areas; 3) Investigate the general ecology of several tropical biomes, including highland cloud forest, mangrove forest, coral reefs, lowland rain forests and dry forests; and 4) Study from the perspective of an informed Christian steward of the creation.

    Required Pre-requisites: One semester of zoology or an applied laboratory science, Recommended Prerequisites: One semester of general chemistry or physics.
    Corequisites: Corequisites: LAS 352.

    Notes: Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.
  
  •  

    LAS 341 - Field Research

    (2)
    OFFERED SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY. This course is a required component of the Latin American Studies Program’s concentration in Environmental Science. Participants will perform field research in one or more tropical biomes in Costa Rica or the surrounding region.

    Notes: Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.
  
  •  

    LAS 350 - Service Project/Internship

    (3)
    This course is a required component of the Latin American Studies Program’s concentrations in both Latin American Studies and Advanced Languages and Literature. Participants gain valuable and pertinent first-hand experiences in service opportunities related to their classroom studies. In recent semesters, service projects have been organized not only in Costa Rica but in neighboring countries throughout Latin America.

    Notes: Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.
  
  •  

    LAS 351 - Case Study Project

    (3)
    OFFERED FALL SEMESTERS ONLY. This course is a required component of the Latin American Studies Program’s concentration in International Business: Management and Marketing. Students will be a part of a hands-on case study project in Latin America. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Latin American Studies Program, a study abroad semester based in Costa Rica.


Law

  
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    LAW 501 - Legal Issues in Management

    (3)
    This course reviews concepts of basic business and employment law and has a particular emphasis on the evolving body of law regarding: Civil Rights, OSHA, ERISA and other governmental regulation of human resource matters; the use of technology and intellectual property rights; entity formation, taxation, estate planning and other finance related areas of law; and Uniform Commercial Code, the enforceability of electronic agreements, evidentiary problems, privacy, consumer rights, intellectual property as it relates to E-Commerce, and trans-border issues. A basic understanding of business law is presumed and a course in the principles of business law is a prerequisite.


Leadership Studies

  
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    LED 101 - Theological/Theoretical Foundations For Servant Leadership

    (2)
    This course helps participants build a theological, theoretical and practical foundation for becoming effective leaders. It is designed to help students analyze an organization’s leadership strengths and weaknesses and act intelligently to provide appropriate leadership functions for it.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: LED 112 or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    LED 112 - Leadership Field Experience I

    (1)
    This field experience requires the student to perform 30 hours of evaluated contact in an on-campus club, organization, or ministry. Through this regular, weekly, on-campus involvement, the student will integrate the theories of leading and following explored in LED 101 into an actual atmosphere of leading and following.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: LED 101 or permission of the instructor.

  
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    LED 201 - Servant Leadership Development

    (2)
    Based on Jesus’ teaching on servant leading, this course explores how leaders can serve Christ and his kingdom, pursue an organization’s mission and develop its people by providing service through leadership. Special emphasis is placed on leading as a servant of Christ.

    Prerequisites: LED 101, LED 112, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 212 - Leadership Field Experience II

    (1)
    In this course students observe and practice the attitudes and function of servant leadership through an experience of 65 hours of service in the local community. They will integrate the classroom experience of LED 201 into actual practice of servant leading. This experience is over and above the 180 hour requirement for graduation from the university.

    Prerequisites: LED 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 301 - Personal Life of the Leader

    (2)
    Character is the single most important asset a leader has. Jesus, talking to his newly appointed apostles about leadership, said it in plain language, “The good man out of the good stored up in his heart will produce good things, and the evil out of the evil treasure brings forth what is evil.” This course explores life habits that cultivate character qualities essential to effective servant leadership.

    Prerequisites: LED 212 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 312 - Leadership Field Experience III

    (1)
    This course requires an inter-cultural immersion through a 65 hour participation on the mission trip sponsored by CCU. As students serve in another culture, they are asked to observe leadership patterns and processes applied in that culture and evaluate similarities and differences in the leadership patterns they observe. They will also evaluate their own character and actions under the stresses of intercultural immersion.

    Prerequisites: LED 301 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 333 - Strategic Foresight: Exploring the Future of Global Change

    (3)
    This course focuses on the development of strategic foresight skills for use in society, business, and personal life. The overarching purpose of this course is to provide students with concepts, tools, and experiences that are useful for the development of viable and preferred futures. The course examines how the use of strategic foresight can be used to describe and manage coming changes. Upon completion of this course students should have a clearer grasp of strategic foresight methods, their advantages and disadvantages, and how to apply them in research, business and their personal lives both locally and globally.

  
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    LED 401 - Lifelong Leadership

    (2)
    Because effective leadership is so situation-driven, leaders must be equipped to lead in a given context. This course helps each student identify the specific realities of a given professional field and begin cultivating attitudes and skills essential to leading in that context.

    Prerequisites: LED 412 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 412 - Leadership Field Experience IV

    (1)
    This field experience focuses on how face-to-face interaction with a follower is organized, facilitated, and evaluated. It requires the practices of coaching, mentoring, supporting, advising, and observing a process of spiritual growth through 30 hours of direct mentoring.

    Prerequisites: LED 312 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 450 - Leadership Internship

    (3)
    This course requires a 120 hour internship centered in the student’s major coursework. The field experience integrates the leadership principles learned in the classroom with the realities of work in an occupational setting.

    Prerequisites: LED 212 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LED 501 - Leadership and Management I

    (3)
    The leadership and management course helps learners understand the theories and realities of the managerial functions and processes in organizations. The course also explores organizational leadership/”followership” issues with special emphasis on the Biblical principles related to organizational leadership.

  
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    LED 502 - Leadership and Management II

    (3)
    Continuation of LED 501.

    Prerequisites: LED 501.
  
  •  

    LED 505 - Problem-Solving and Decision-Making for Leaders

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide students with rational analytical tools to facilitate handling of both routine and non-routine management functions. These tools are systematic techniques or processes designed to improve a manager’s ability to gather, organize and evaluate information in the areas of problem-solving, decision-making and plan implementation.

  
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    LED 510 - Values Aligned Leadership

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide the leader with a background in traditional ethical theories and the opportunity to consider ethical issues and dilemmas in the information age and the modern management era. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of the Bible and the Christian tradition into the making of ethical decisions.

  
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    LED 515 - Leading in Intercultural Business Environments

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to explore ideas that help us lead effectively with people from diverse business cultures. Basic tenets of leading will be examined and introductory concepts of cultural understanding will be explored. The field of inquiry will then be integrated to begin a process of thinking about leading in intercultural contexts.


Los Angeles Film Studies Center

  
  •  

    LAF 327 - Hollywood Production Workshop

    (3)
    This course offers students the opportunity to make a motion picture production using Hollywood locations, resources, and protocol. Students work collaboratively in groups to create a festival-ready piece, including all the legal documentation and rights to enable the finished production to qualify for a festival submission.

  
  •  

    LAF 329 - Theology in Hollywood

    (4)
    This course encourages the development of the necessary skills for analysis of the culture of Hollywood, its role in popular culture and the theological intersections therein. The course seeks theological engagement with the culture of Hollywood and cinema by investigating some of the social, ethical, and psychological implications of film upon theology.

  
  •  

    LAF 336 - Inside Hollywood

    (6)
    Students participate in an internship experience in some aspect of the Hollywood entertainment industry.

  
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    LAF 448 - Motion Picture Production

    (3)
    This is an intense hands-on course in short film production. Students individually write, shoot, direct, and edit their own projects.

  
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    LAF 450 - Film Industry Internship: Inside Hollywood

    (6)
    Students participate in an internship experience in some aspect of the Hollywood entertainment industry. These are nonpaying positions primarily in an office setting such as development companies, agencies, management companies, post-production facilities, etc. Students work 20 to 24 hours a week, spread over a three to five day schedule. Orientation to the internship includes an overview of the creative and operational aspects of the Hollywood entertainment business, including the Christian’s role in working therein. The internships do not include positions on actual filmmaking locations. Instead, students work in offices as support personnel to producers, writers, directors, agents, post-production personnel, and others involved in the total process of producing and distributing a major motion picture. The Los Angeles Film Studies Center provides interns to many of the major companies within Hollywood. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Los Angeles Film Studies Center off-campus studies semester in Los Angeles, California.

  
  •  

    LAF 454 - Professional Screenwriting

    (3)
    This is a course in contemporary screenwriting, including an understanding of dramatic structure, character, and dialogue development, and the writing process. Students complete a full-length screenplay for a feature film or “movie-of-the-week.”

  
  •  

    LAF 460 - Independent study

    (3)
    This course may be set up by special request and arrangement. Students must submit a portfolio and a project proposal. If approved, the student will be appointed a mentor to supervise the project. Projects could include further development of a portfolio or reel, critical research, or a senior thesis project.


Management

  
  •  

    MGT 201 - Leadership and Management of Organizations

    (3)
    Management roles and functions are considered by studying theories and approaches of historical significance. Leadership and “followership” in both traditional hierarchical structures as well as in informal groups are examined with an emphasis on organizational mission, ethical issues, communication skills, and conflict resolution.

    Notes: Course appropriate for all majors. In cooperation with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, courses under the MCS prefix are earned through a semester-long program of study at the Contemporary Music Center CMC on Martha’s Vineyard. This interdisciplinary off-campus study program provides a community for young musicians and aspiring music executives to plumb the depths of their creative souls and test the waters of a career in popular music. Designed as an artists’ community, the program seeks to develop artists and music executives with a Christ-centered vision for music content, production and delivery. The mission of the CMC is to prepare students academically and creatively for potential careers in the music industry.
  
  •  

    MGT 270 - Project Management Fundamentals

    (3)
    This course explores project management from a strategic management perspective, focusing on development of leadership skills in the management of project teams. Students examine the roles of the manager and management team; project selection, organization, and planning process; communications and negotiations; and the tactical and strategic implications in a project environment.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    MGT 305 - Human Resource Management

    (3)
    Examine the human resources life cycle as it applies to the changing workforce, staffing, supervision, compensation, and legal implications of the human resources function.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 104, BUS 110, CIS 101, MGT 201.
  
  •  

    MGT 306 - Managerial and Corporate Communication

    (3)
    This course includes integration of communication and management theory; communication skills, styles, and climate; organizational surveys, communication audits, communication with various stakeholder groups and interviewing.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 104, BUS 110, CIS 101, MGT 201.
  
  •  

    MGT 307 - Organizational Behavior

    (3)
    Roles, behaviors, skills, and interactions necessary in organizational structures; implications for organization design, job design, and leadership.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 104, BUS 110, CIS 101, MGT 201.
  
  •  

    MGT 308 - Negotiations and Conflict Management

    (3)
    Strategy and tactics of distributive and integrative bargaining; communication and persuasion processes and conflict management techniques; negotiation simulations and case studies.

    Prerequisites: MGT 201.
  
  •  

    MGT 330 - Project Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling

    (3)
    To be successful, project managers must analyze alternative project decisions by relying heavily on project estimating and control tools and techniques. This course provides students with the skills required to plan, baseline, monitor, analyze, and evaluate project performance. Students work in groups to analyze program parameters and work situations.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MGT 270.
  
  •  

    MGT 340 - Project and Program Risk Management

    (3)
    This course examines the aspects of project risk analysis and management. It establishes the means to analyze risks and opportunities within projects, and identifies methods for reducing the risks and improving project performance. The focus is on understanding the role of effective risk management to enhance opportunities in today’s accelerated change environment.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MGT 270.
  
  •  

    MGT 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 360 - Leading Strategic Project Management

    (3)
    This course is structured to leverage student’s knowledge gained in previous courses. Students extend their previous knowledge to encompass the principles of strategic planning and how it relates to project management. Students are required to utilize an industry validated Project Management Maturity Model to assess how far along an organization has progressed. Using previously acquired knowledge and skills students are expected to address all environmental factors facing an organization transforming itself into a project-based organization using project management to gain competitive advantage.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MGT 270.
  
  •  

    MGT 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 400 - Business Policy and Systems Management

    (3)
    Study of existing information and business processing systems and the resulting system improvement. Students will focus on developmental, maintenance, analytical, and reconstructive aspects of business systems. Serving as a capstone course for the business program, the course integrates concepts from various business disciplines. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social/political, technological, and competition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm’s objectives. Students will be required to apply and demonstrate a competence in the business disciplines.

    Prerequisites: ACC 202, BUS 101, BUS 303, CIS 101, ECO 221, MGT 201, MKT 202, and senior standing.
  
  •  

    MGT 407 - Management Problem-Solving and Decision-Making

    (3)
    Fundamental and advanced techniques for making decisions and solving problems at all leadership levels in business and in life. These systematic techniques, or processes, are designed to improve the student’s ability to gather, organize, and evaluate information in the areas of problem solving, decision making and plan implementation.

    Prerequisites: ACC 202, BUS 101, BUS 303, CIS 101, ECO 221, MGT 201, MKT 202, and senior standing.
  
  •  

    MGT 420 - Productions/Operations

    (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to quantitative and qualitative methods primarily in the services market environment. Emphasis is placed on contemporary models such as TQM, Six Sigma and Model II Thinking.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    MGT 450 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 491 - Project Management Capstone

    (3)
    “This course was not found in the supplied content but, was listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, if possible, with the correct information.”

  
  •  

    MGT 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MGT 520 - Fundamentals of Project Management for Business

    (3)
    This course explores from a strategic management perspective, focusing on development of leadership skills in the management of project teams. Students explore the roles of the project manager and project management teams; project selection, organization, and planning process; communications and negotiations; and the tactical and strategic implications in a project environment.

  
  •  

    MGT 560 - Business Project Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling

    (3)
    To be successful, project managers must analyze alternative project decisions by relying heavily on project planning, scheduling, estimating, control, and risk management tools and techniques. Course provides students with the skills required to plan, baseline, monitor, analyze, and evaluate project performance and associated risks.

    Prerequisites: MGT 520.
  
  •  

    MGT 610 - Strategic Leadership of Project Management in Business

    (3)
    This course is structured to leverage student’s knowledge gained in two previous courses. Students extend their previous knowledge to encompass the principles of strategic leadership and how it relates to project management. Using previously acquired knowledge and skills, students are expected to address all environmental factors facing an organization using project management concepts, tools and techniques to gain competitive advantage.

    Prerequisites: MGT 520, MGT 560.

Management of Information Systems

  
  •  

    MIT 270 - Management Information Systems

    (3)
    Study of modern business information systems focusing on the analysis, design, and implementation of computer hardware and software as they relate to managing business information.

    Prerequisites: CIS 101.
  
  •  

    MIT 312 - Electronic Commerce

    (3)
    A look at how emerging information systems and communication technologies influence today’s marketplace by the use of electronic commerce to buy and sell products and services, and to enhance business processes. This course examines the drivers of the second wave of electric commerce, marketing and business strategies, legal, ethical, and tax and payment issues when conducting business on the internet.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102
  
  •  

    MIT 316 - Information Security

    (3)
    Basic information goals of availability, integrity, accuracy, and confidentiality. Vocabulary and terminology specific to the field of information security are discussed. Identification of exposures and vulnerabilities and appropriate countermeasures are addressed. The importance of appropriate planning and administrative controls is also discussed.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MIT 270.
  
  •  

    MIT 330 - Managing and Supporting Information Technology

    (3)
    Covers the unique dimensions of leading information technology employees and information technology resources towards organizational goals.

    CUS Prerequisites: CIS 201. CAGS Prerequisites: ENG 102, MIT 270.
  
  •  

    MIT 426 - Database Management I

    (3)
    Course provides technical and managerial skills in planning, analysis, logical design, physical design, and implementation of a database. Course topics include: data base concepts; data models query languages; SQL; entity-relationship modeling, normalization, object-oriented databases, ORACLE database management, data warehousing, database integrity management (data security), database replication/synchronization; and transaction management.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MIT 270.
  
  •  

    MIT 464 - Software Application Design I

    (3)
    Event driven programming with Microsoft Visual Languages; emphasis on the development cycle to create applications that incorporate forms and controls, program-decision structures, looping, and procedures. These programs combine the object-oriented elements of decomposition, reuse, reliability, abstraction, classification, and inheritance.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, MIT 270.
  
  •  

    MIT 491 - MIS Capstone Project

    (3)
    Students assimilate and apply previous coursework in the CIS and MIT programs to a comprehensive problem in the area of management information systems.

    CUS Prerequisites: CIS 410, MIT 488 and senior standing. CAGS Prerequisites: Completion of or current enrollment in all major coursework.
  
  •  

    MIT 501 - Information Systems Management

    (3)
    This course is based on the premise that it is difficult, if not impossible, to manage a modern organization without basic knowledge of information systems; i.e., what information systems are, how they affect the organization and its employees, and how they can make businesses more efficient and competitive. Participants develop knowledge, sensitivities, and skills that will enable them to stay current in the fast changing MIS environment.


Marketing

  
  •  

    MKT 202 - Principles of Marketing

    (3)
    Strategic planning of a marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution) within the context of the external business environment, including target market analysis. Also, impact of technology and globalization on the field of marketing.

    CUS Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 104, CIS 101. CAGS Prerequisites: None.
  
  •  

    MKT 309 - Professional Selling

    (3)
    Prospecting and qualifying; planning the sales presentation and closing the sale; legal, ethical, and social responsibilities; and sales support and managing the sales force.

    Prerequisites: MKT 202.
  
  •  

    MKT 310 - Marketing Research and Consumer Behavior

    (3)
    This course teaches the basics of marketing research and the cultural, social, personal, and psychological factors influencing buyer behavior; buying-decision processes and stages; and learning theory integrated with consumer beliefs and attitudes.

    Prerequisites: BUS 212, MKT 202.
  
  •  

    MKT 314 - Advertising Management

    (3)
    Developing an advertising campaign from target market analysis and creative strategy, production, and media planning. Also, legal and ethical aspects of advertising.

    Prerequisites: MKT 202.
  
  •  

    MKT 350 - Internship

    (1 to 3)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 450 - Internship

    (1 to 3)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MKT 510 - Marketing Strategy

    (3)
    This course may take a variety of forms. Topics of special interest to students may be addressed in sessions offered as “Contemporary Business Issues” seminars. Alternatively, with special permission, a student may: 1) elect to participate in a guided graduate study (via one of the graduate programs at CCU; 2) pursue a specific field of inquiry through enrollment in a course at another accredited university with transfer of the credit earned.


Masters of Business Administration

  
  •  

    MBA 699 - MBA Capstone Course

    (3)
    This course will be the final course taken by each student in the program and is designed to assist the student in assimilating and synthesizing the material covered in the program. It will focus on taking an integrated approach to management problem-solving and decision-making using all of the functional areas of business. The course will involve preparation of a business plan in a problem of the student’s choosing.

    Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in all MBA coursework. Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. For those course numbers that are similar or identical, “CUS” or “CAGS” will be used to differentiate.

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MAT 095 - Medication Administration for Healthcare Professionals

    (1)
    (Nursing Students Only) This is a continuing education offering. Introduces the healthcare professional to concepts and techniques of dosage calculations and medication administration by a variety of routes. Learners apply basic math concepts to complex conversion of dosages between and among various systems of weights and volumes. Learners will apply critical thinking skills to the calculation and administration of medications. Concepts are introduced from a Christian perspective and serve as foundation to subsequent nursing courses.

  
  •  

    MAT 110 - Math Concepts

    (3)
    Gives students an awareness of the role mathematics plays in today’s society and how it is used to understand and solve relevant problems. Develops a student’s numerical literacy to confidently interpret and communicate numerical information. Topics include a brief introduction to the principles of logic, numerical concepts and problem solving, algebraic concepts in the context of mathematical modeling, and statistical reasoning with an emphasis on descriptive methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 111 - College Algebra

    (3)
    Study of equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, exponents, logarithms.

    Prerequisite: Sufficient evidence of appropriate math skills and /or ACT or COMPASS scores. Meets general education requirements for mathematics.
  
  •  

    MAT 141 - Calculus I

    (4)
    Derivatives of polynomial and trigonometric functions, applications of the derivative, the definite integral, the fundamental theorems of calculus, and applications of integration.

    Prerequisites: MAT 111 or equivalent.
  
  •  

    MAT 202 - Math Literacy

    (2)
    Designed for elementary and secondary teachers. K-12 mathematical concepts covering the Colorado Model Content Standards.

    Notes: This course does not meet general education requirements in Mathematics.
  
  •  

    MAT 241 - Calculus II

    (4)
    Continuation of MAT 141. Limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, integrals, applications of integrals, techniques of integration, infinite sequences and series including Taylor’s series.

    Prerequisites: MAT 141.
  
  •  

    MAT 242 - Calculus III

    (4)
    Calculus of functions of more than one variable. Topics include partial derivatives, definite integrals over planes and solid regions, vectors and their applications, and Green’s Theorem and its generalizations.

    Prerequisites: MAT 241.
  
  •  

    MAT 312 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

    (3)
    Study of matrix algebra and computations, the solution and application of linear systems of equations. Development of vector space ideas starting with R? moving to R”, and then to the study of abstract vector spaces and their linear transformations. Applications and computational topics such as LU decompositions, orthogonal projections and QR decompositions. Brief introduction to Eigenvectors.

    Prerequisites: MAT 242.
  
  •  

    MAT 314 - Abstract Algebra

    (3)
    Axiomatic approach to the principle structures of modern abstract algebra, including introductions to the theories of groups, rings, integral domains, and fields.

    Prerequisites: MAT 241.
    Notes: Appropriate applications introduced.
  
  •  

    MAT 325 - Introduction to Discrete Mathematics

    (3)
    Topics in discrete mathematics including graph theory, combinatorics, and linear programming. Emphasis will be placed on mathematical modeling of realistic problems using discrete processes.

    Prerequisites: MAT 312.
  
  •  

    MAT 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit. Junior standing.
  
  •  

    MAT 352 - Differential Equations

    (3)
    First, second, and higher-order equations; systems, approximations, series methods, and applications in science.

    Prerequisites: MAT 242.
  
  •  

    MAT 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MAT 410 - Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

    (3)
    Introduction to mathematical logic and techniques of formal proofs. Emphasis on enhancing student’s ability to write and understand mathematical proofs. Rigorous approach to elementary topics such as sets, relations, and functions and introduction to number theory.

    Prerequisites: MAT 242, MAT 312.
  
  •  

    MAT 420 - Probability and Statistics

    (4)
    Basic probability topics and statistical theory, focusing on data and the skills and mathematical tools needed to collect and analyze data. Elementary probability including the study of event trees, conditional probability, and Bayes’ Theorem. Basic distributions (normal, binomial, chi square, exponential, poisson, etc.) used to model variability in data sets. Methods of statistical inference including parameter estimation and hypotheses testing.

    Prerequisites: MAT 241.
  
  •  

    MAT 450 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit. Senior standing.
  
  •  

    MAT 455 - Foundations of Geometry

    (3)
    Axiomatic approach to Euclidean geometry via Hilbert’s axioms; introduction to the historical development of non-Euclidean geometries and questions relating to the parallel postulate.

    Prerequisites: MAT 241.
  
  •  

    MAT 465 - History of Mathematics

    (2)
    History and development of mathematics with emphasis on understanding the distinctive nature of mathematical activity and its impact on society.

    Prerequisites: MAT 310.
  
  •  

    MAT 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MAT 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    MAT 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.

Middle East Studies Program

  
  •  

    MID 111 - Introduction to Arabic Language I

    (3)
    This course, taught by Egyptian instructors affiliated with the American University in Cairo, aims to help students acquire basic skills in Egyptian Arabic, a dialect widely understood in the Arab world. The course emphasizes the practical use of the language, encouraging interaction with the locals through the use of “language lab Cairo” assignments or during visits to service projects. Small classes four days a week offer a solid introduction to the colloquial grammar and a substantial vocabulary as students take more than 100 hours of instruction. Once completed, MID 111 and MID 112 should bring students to the intermediate level of Egyptian colloquial Arabic. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Middle East Studies Program, a study abroad semester program based in Cairo, Egypt.

  
  •  

    MID 112 - Introduction to Arabic Language II

    (3)
    This course, taught by Egyptian instructors affiliated with the American University in Cairo, aims to help students acquire basic skills in Egyptian Arabic, a dialect widely understood in the Arab world. The course emphasizes the practical use of the language, encouraging interaction with the locals through the use of “language lab Cairo” assignments or during visits to service projects. Small classes four days a week offer a solid introduction to the colloquial grammar and a substantial vocabulary as students take more than 100 hours of instruction. Once completed, MID 111 and MID 112 should bring students to the intermediate level of Egyptian colloquial Arabic. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Middle East Studies Program, a study abroad semester program based in Cairo, Egypt.

  
  •  

    MID 310 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

    (3)
    With an emphasis on anthropological approaches to the region, this course examines the variety of peoples and cultures in the Middle East in societies like Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Israel/Palestine, Turkey, or perhaps other countries as well. MESP for example, has recently added Tunisia and Morocco for the first time to its possible travel options. While the selection of travel locations will depend upon safety conditions and budgetary constraints prevailing at the time of travel, the course nonetheless seeks to introduce students to patterns of thought and behavior which characterize the region generally without losing sight of important differences across countries. The Middle East is a multiethnic, multi-confessional region, and student travel allows them to observe and study a great variety of social, religious, and political groups. In addition, students learn about pressing issues, from gender to war to economic development, that currently animate the many religious and political communities they visit. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Middle East Studies Program, a study abroad semester program based in Cairo, Egypt.

  
  •  

    MID 320 - Conflict and Change in the Middle East

    (3)
    This course examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, or what many scholars now call “the 100 years war.” Beginning with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, the course traces the origin of the conflict from the early encounters between Arab and Jew in Palestine to the contemporary struggle to achieve a final status agreement between Israelis and Palestinians today. Students learn about the complexity and difficulty of reaching peace in an otherwise tiny space shared by two peoples with competing civilizational visions. While current conflict between the two peoples may prohibit travel to Israel/Palestine, the course usually includes a ten day on-site component in Israel/Palestine in order to give students first-hand experience seeing and hearing the important people and places that make this conflict so difficult. This component is subject to change based on safety considerations. Finally, another important part of the course includes an intense negotiation simulation in Cairo, where students take on role characters, Israeli and Palestinian respectively, and actively engage their counterparts across the table in final status talks related to Jerusalem, borders and security, refugees, water, and settlements.

    Notes: Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Middle East Studies Program, a study abroad semester program based in Cairo, Egypt.
 

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