Academic Catalog 2008-2009 
    
    Feb 06, 2023  
Academic Catalog 2008-2009 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies  (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS)  (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. For those course numbers that are similar or identical, “CUS” or “CAGS” will be used to differentiate.

 

Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.

Business

  
  •  

    BUS 101 - Introduction to Business

    (3)
    Overview of functional areas (accounting, finance, management, marketing, and computer information systems) and operating environments common to all business and nonprofit organizations.

  
  •  

    BUS 104 - Essential Skills for Business Communication

    (3)
    Introductory course designed to develop and strengthen skills of effective business and professional communication in both written and oral modes. Course includes heavy emphases on effective research and the process of writing with a particular focus on both academic and business writing.

    Notes: This course provides a quantitative base for all business programs
  
  •  

    BUS 110 - Quantitative Mathematics for Business

    (3)
    A thorough study of Business Mathematics, including Taxation, Profit/Loss, introductory statistics and the time value of money. .

    CUS Prerequisites: CIS 101 (may be taken as a Corequisite as well). CAGS Prerequisites: None.
  
  •  

    BUS 201 - Finance Essentials

    (3)
    This course deals with capital budgeting and acquisitions. Principles and techniques learned in this course will enable students to make major capital purchase decisions based upon solid financial information. Students will apply knowledge learned in this course to real-life situations.

  
  •  

    BUS 212 - Probability and Statistics/Business

    (3)
    Study of basic probability and statistical concepts from a business applications perspective.

    CUS Prerequisites: MAT 111 or higher or BUS 110. CAGS Prerequisites: MAT 110 or higher.
  
  •  

    BUS 240 - Grant Writing

    (3)
    This course provides an overview of the process for obtaining grant revenues, including researching prospective funding sources, developing and maintaining relationships with investors, writing the grant proposal, preparing proposal attachments, and managing grants within the context of larger fundraising and organizational goals.

  
  •  

    BUS 301 - Business Finance

    (3)
    Practical overview of relevant foundational aspects of business finance such as the role of the finance manager, risk-return, time value of money, ratio analysis, and financing decisions; basic application of these principles to the business environment.

    CUS Prerequisites: ACC 202, CIS 201, MAT 130. CAGS Prerequisites: ACC 202, ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 303 - Business Law I

    (3)
    Practical overview of relevant foundational aspects of business law, such as contracts, agency, and commercial transactions, and basic application of these principles to the workplace.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 310 - Business Statistics and Financial Calculations

    (3)
    A thorough examination of Business Statistics including multi-variable regression, ANOVA, Estimation and Hypothesis Testing. This course will also cover Bond and Stock valuation, risk, and portfolio assessment.

    Prerequisites: BUS 210.
    Notes: For CUS students, this class serves as an alternative for BUS 212.
  
  •  

    BUS 313 - Legal Issues for Nonprofit Organizations

    (3)
    Legal issues specifically pertinent to the nonprofit organization. Issues covered are broad, including counseling issues, international law, associations, and fundraising.

    Prerequisites: BUS 303.
  
  •  

    BUS 320 - Investments

    (3)
    Survey of security analysis and evaluation, portfolio management, and licensing and regulation of security markets.

    Prerequisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, BUS 301.
    Notes: Class enrollment may be strictly limited; recommendation of student’s advisor may be required.
  
  •  

    BUS 330 - Fiscal Management in Non-Profit Organizations

    (3)
    This course will provide a practical examination and analysis of fiscal management as it relates directly to non-profit entities. It will provide knowledge and skill sets of fiscal operations and responsibilities through the application of financial accounting, budgeting and reporting processes that are essential for Christian leaders and managers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    BUS 370 - International Business

    (3)
    Survey of the global arena in which international business operates. Covers such topics as international monetary system, regional trading blocs, and political and cultural implications. Surveys the international aspects of each of the functional areas of business (finance, marketing, organization, strategy, etc.).

    Prerequisites: CIS 201, ECO 211, ECO 212.
  
  •  

    BUS 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    BUS 400 - Business Policy and Systems Management

    (3)
    Study of existing information and business processing systems and the resulting systemimprovement. Students will focus on developmental, maintenance, analytical, and reconstructive aspects of business systems. Serving as a capstone course for the business program, this course integrates concepts from various business disciplines. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social/political, technological, and competition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm’s objectives. Students will be required to apply and demonstrate a competence in the business disciplines.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101, CIS 201, ACC 202, MGT 201, MKT 202.
  
  •  

    BUS 408 - Business Ethics

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a background in traditional ethical theories and the opportunity to consider ethical issues and dilemmas in the information age and the modern management era. Particular emphasis is placed on integration of the Bible and Christian tradition in the making of ethical decisions.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101, CIS 101, ECO 221, ACC 202, MGT 201, MKT 202, BUS 303, senior standing.
    Corequisites: CUS

  
  •  

    BUS 408A - Beyond Integrity: Business Ethics for the 21st Century Organizational Leader

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide the student with a background in traditional ethical theories and the opportunity to consider ethical issues and dilemmas in the post-modern, high-tech organization including leadership and management practices, policies and operational procedures that are aligned with Biblical principles. Particular emphasis is placed on integration of the Bible and Christian tradition in the making of ethical decisions.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
    Corequisites: CAGS

  
  •  

    BUS 410 - Advanced Topics in Business Finance

    (3)
    Practical overview of relevant foundational aspects of business finance such as the role of the finance manager, risk-return, time value of money, ratio analysis, and financing decisions; basic application of these principles to the business environment. This course will also examine tactical and strategic financing decisions as well as working capital management and special topics such as reorganization, liquidation, mergers, divestitures, LBO’s, bankruptcy, and multinational financial management.

    Prerequisites: BUS 212 or BUS 310.
  
  •  

    BUS 413 - Business Law II

    (3)
    Continuation of BUS 303 with emphasis on more advanced concepts of business law.

    Prerequisites: BUS 303, ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 450 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Field experience in business as structured with an outside organization. Only students reflecting exceptional academic performance will be approved. Requires the approval of student’s advisor.

    Prerequisite: Sufficient course work as approved by the student’s advisor.
  
  •  

    BUS 452 - Organizational Behavior

    (3)
    How group behavior affects organizational effectiveness, decision making, and group conflicts; strategies for efficient group and task management; introduction to effective written communication.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 454 - Organization Theory and Practice

    (3)
    An organization theory, design and structure course that uses a systems management approach to analyze the leadership, processes, environment, lifecycle, culture, value system, and change management impacts on organizations.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 455 - Innovation and Management Decision Making

    (3)
    This course is designed to teach fundamental and advanced techniques for making decisions and solving problems in business; managing people, information, and capital resources. The overall purpose of this course is to provide the adult learner with rational analytical tools to facilitate his or her handling of routine and non-routine management functions. These tools are systematic techniques, or processes, designed to improve the adult learners ability to gather, organize, and evaluate information in the areas of problem solving, decision making and plan implementation. Consequently, effective questioning techniques are a major theme in this course. In essence, if one knows what questions to ask and how and when to ask them he or she will gather better information.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 466 - Professional Communications

    (3)
    Review and improve professional writing and presentation.

  
  •  

    BUS 470 - Human Resource Administration I

    (3)
    This course will provide students with a basic understanding of human resource management concepts and issues to include Equal Employment Opportunity, affirmative action, job analysis, labor planning, recruitment, selection, separation, compensation, benefit administration, HRIS, OSHA, and labor relations.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 471 - Human Resource Administration II

    (3)
    This course is a continuation of BUS 470, Human Resource Administration I. Course focus is on compensation, labor relations, and the emerging function of global human resource management.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102, BUS 470.
  
  •  

    BUS 474 - Leadership & Management

    (3)
    Motivational theory related to individual and group functions at work and home. Leadership styles, negotiation, and their impact on productivity.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 479 - International Business Cultures

    (3)
    Cultures vary in their practices of business though universally each culture strives to conduct business in a manner that meets basic commercial objectives. This course explores global markets, cultural imperatives of countries and the complexities of conducting business internationally. The course concludes with the development of a business plan to operate a business segment/division overseas.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    BUS 485 - Capstone Project

    (3)
    This course is designed to assimilate and integrate the adult learner’s readings, discussions and experiences in the program and cause him or her to make a practical application of the materials.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in all major course work.
  
  •  

    BUS 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    BUS 491 - MHR Capstone

    (3)
    Practical implementation of theories and concepts in an individual project that applies to occupation or avocation. Practical use of library resources and computer database systems for project research.

    Prerequisites: BUS 470, 471 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in all other major course work.
  
  •  

    BUS 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    BUS 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    BUS 530 - Human Resources Management

    (3)
    Human capital is at the core of every organization. Successful managers fully connect an commit to their people in creating value. This course will explore the critical link between human resources and organizational strategy in theory and practice by focusing on key elements of strategic human resource management.


Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHM 111 - Nutrition

    (3)
    Nutrients and their functions in the body. Nutrition and health, clinical applications of nutrition, and facts and fallacies of diet. Meets nutrition prerequisites for students planning to enter various advanced programs for health science-oriented professions.

  
  •  

    CHM 121 - General Chemistry I

    (4)
    Atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and gas and solution chemistry.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of High School Algebra II or equivalent (i.e. CCU’s MAT 111 College Algebra) with a C- or better.
    Corequisites: Corequisites: See CHM 131 and 141 for corequisite lab and recitation. Corequisites: CHM 131 (Lab), CHM 141 (Recitation).

  
  •  

    CHM 122 - General Chemistry II

    (4)
    Major concepts in four areas of chemistry: physical chemistry (kinetics and equilibrium), analytical chemistry (acids, base, redox), inorganic chemistry (atmospheric chemistry and metals), organic chemistry (alkanes and function groups).

    Prerequisites: CHM 121.
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 132 (Lab), CHM 142 (Recitation).

  
  •  

    CHM 131 - General Chemistry I Lab

    (1)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 121.

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Four-hour lab.
  
  •  

    CHM 132 - General Chemistry II Lab

    (1)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 122.

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Four-hour lab.
  
  •  

    CHM 141 - General Chemistry I Recitation

    (0)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 121.

  
  •  

    CHM 142 - General Chemistry II Recitation

    (0)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 122.

  
  •  

    CHM 221 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4)
    Introduction to the study of structure, reactions, properties, and mechanisms of organic molecules.

    Prerequisites: CHM 122.
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 231 (Lab), CHM 241 (Recitation).

  
  •  

    CHM 222 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4)
    Continuation of CHM 221. Emphasis on organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Chemistry of heterocycles and biologically related compounds introduced.

    Prerequisites: CHM 221.
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 232 (Lab), CHM 242 (Recitation).

  
  •  

    CHM 231 - Organic Chemistry I Lab

    (1)
    Basic organic procedures using microscale lab techniques, computer simulation, and data acquisition.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 221.

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Four-hour lab.
    Notes: Optional for biology majors, but required for pre-med majors and post-graduate programs.
  
  •  

    CHM 232 - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    (1)
    Continuation of CHM 231.

    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 222.

    Lab/Lecture Hours
    Four-hour lab.
  
  •  

    CHM 241 - Organic Chemistry I Recitation

    (0)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 221.

  
  •  

    CHM 242 - Organic Chemistry II Recitation

    (0)
    Corequisites: Corequisites: CHM 222.

  
  •  

    CHM 331 - Biochemistry

    (3)
    Introduction to principles of biochemistry for science and health science-oriented majors. Topics include protein structure, enzyme kinetics, intermediary metabolism and metabolic control, and the molecular biology of gene expression. Special topics include metabolic disorders, the biochemistry of cancer, and the human genome project.

    Prerequisites: CHM 222
    Notes: May be taken in place of CHM 222 by biology majors.
  
  •  

    CHM 450 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Senior standing. Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    CHM 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    CHM 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    CHM 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.

China Studies Program

  
  •  

    CHS 110 - Chinese I

    (3)
    This course in introductory Chinese focuses on acquiring survival fluency in spoken and written Chinese. The emphasis is on the spoken form of Mandarin Chinese, the national language of China. Students who already have studied Chinese may apply for a more advanced class, in which they would study with other international students studying at Xiamen University. All students take the written exams for Chinese characters, vocabulary and grammar of the Chinese I course. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 111 - Chinese II

    (1 to 3)
    This course focuses on acquiring low-intermediate fluency in spoken and written Chinese so that a student can handle situations such as travel planning, illness, making appointments, etc. The emphasis is on the spoken form of Mandarin Chinese, the national language of China. There will also be lectures on Chinese dialects, simplified v. traditional characters, and word radicals. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 211 - Chinese Art

    (1)
    Students will learn from a Chinese artist the basics of Chinese water-based brushwork, painting traditional pictures of bamboo, flowers, etc. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 212 - Tai Chi

    (1)
    This physical education course emphasizes traditional Chinese forms of stylized self-defense, which tones the body and concentrates the mind. Exercises may focus on either the gentler form of tai chi, or on the more vigorous wu shu, depending on who is teaching that semester. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. Subject to limits on Physical Education skills credit. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 311 - Chinese History

    (3)
    This seminar course covers the history of China from its earliest beginnings up to the present. In addition to reading the course text, each student will read and make a class presentation on a book that goes into more detail about a major person, event, or aspect of Chinese history and culture such as the Boxer Rebellion, Matteo Ricci, the Mongol Conquest, and the Temple of Heaven. Some presentations will also be given during the study tours, when students visit many of the most famous Chinese sites of historical importance. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 321 - Contemporary Society: Public Policy & Economic Development

    (3)
    This course covers two key and inter-related aspects of modern China: Government policy and economic development. Public policy covers the structure of the Chinese government, legal system, and issues such as ethnic minorities, family planning, and education. Economic development covers the government policies from 1949 to the present, from the commune system to the current market-oriented reforms. Other topics include foreign investment, pollution and the environment, and the World Trade Organization. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 351 - Intercultural Communication

    (3)
    This course covers issues intended to help students understand and adjust to Chinese culture. Topics include culture and basic values, culture shock, individualism and collectivism, contextualization, and multi-culturalism. Each student will write case studies based on their personal experiences in China. Famous films (both Western and Chinese) that focus on cross-cultural experiences will be shown and discussed each week. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.
  
  •  

    CHS 361 - Eastern Philosophy and Religions

    (3)
    This seminar course introduces the basic teachings, history, and development of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and folk religion, as well as their role in China today. In addition to reading the course text, each student will read and make a class presentation on a book that goes into more detail about aspects of Chinese thought that have spread throughout Eastern Asia. Source books for these presentations include the Analects of Confucius, the Tao Te Ching, the I Ching, and the Diamond Sutra, etc. The course will examine these topics from a Christian perspective, seeing to what extent they are compatible with Christian doctrine. Field trips to relevant sites will occur throughout the program. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the China Studies Program study abroad semester. All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

    Notes: All courses are offered in an off-campus program through the College of Undergraduate Studies.

Christian Leadership

  
  •  

    CLP 428 - Praxis of Organizational Health & Growth

    (3)
    The interplay between an organization’s health and its ability to grow. Application of systems management to organizational problems and progress.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    CLP 474 - Spiritual Foundations of Leadership

    (3)
    Basic life qualities essential to personal leadership; exploration of ways to develop these qualities in self and others; and mentoring, discipling, apprenticeship, and praxis relationships.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102.
  
  •  

    CLP 492 - Applied Leadership Project

    (3)
    An individual project that applies leadership concepts to occupation or avocation. Perquisites: Completion of or current enrollment in all major course work.

  
  •  

    CLP 496 - Ideas & Issues

    (3)
    Key philosophical and theological questions, (e.g., comparative religions, problem of evil); and how to form logical conclusions based on source literature.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102. Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. For those course numbers that are similar or identical, “CUS” or “CAGS” will be used to differentiate.

Communication

  
  •  

    COM 103 - Public Speaking

    (3)
    Introductory principles of communication emphasizing public speaking. Aspects of verbal and nonverbal delivery, speech organization, and the effective use of supporting material and presentational aids are addressed. Students give several speeches designed to better equip them for future speaking endeavors

  
  •  

    COM 110 - Oral Communication

    (3)
    Introductory principles of communication emphasizing public speaking. Aspects of verbal and nonverbal delivery, speech organization, the effective use of supporting material and presentational aids are addressed. Students give several speeches designed to better equip them for future speaking endeavors

  
  •  

    COM 160 - University Publications: Newspaper

    (2)
    Design and production of student newspaper.

    Prerequisites: By invitation only
    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/Fail.
  
  •  

    COM 202 - Debate Team

    (1)
    Instruction in debate and argumentation with opportunities to compete at regional and national debate tournaments. Debate forms include Parliamentary, Lincoln-Douglas, Student Congress, and extemporaneous speaking.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 203 - Debate

    (3)
    Covers basic principles and techniques of formal debate including the researching of topics, the presentation of arguments, and the use of debate format. Critical thinking and analysis skills integrated throughout.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 204 - Nonverbal Communication

    (3)
    Discusses basic theories and research related to nonverbal communication. Also looks at the functions and types of nonverbal communication and their impact on relationships.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 205 - Digital Media Lab

    (1)
    Instruction in audio and video production, with special emphasis on video field production and digital nonlinear editing. The lab focuses on the application of basic skills in lighting, shooting, and editing.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 206 - Digital Media Production

    (3)
    Through readings, lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises students will explore the production of electronic sound and imaging. The course has an emphasis on video field production and digital nonlinear editing, but will include a study of framing, composition and light through the production of digital still images.

  
  •  

    COM 210 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3)
    Offers an examination of relational development, conflict management, self-concept, self-disclosure, and attraction within the context of one-on-one communication.

  
  •  

    COM 215 - Introduction to Mass Media

    (3)
    Introduction to mass media is designed to explore the history and makeup of the various mediums that exist in our world, how they correlate, interact, and influence our culture, and how we as Christians are called to discern their value and impact on our world. The course is a survey course of the various mediums with particular emphasis on the media that we use daily.

  
  •  

    COM 225 - Communication Theory and Research

    (3)
    This course examines the major theories and research paradigms in communication, with particular attention to evaluating the work from a Christian perspective. The course focuses on social scientific, interpretive and critical theories and research methodologies, and will cover the process of conducting research including basic inquiry, collecting/analyzing data, and reporting results.

    Prerequisites: COM 103
  
  •  

    COM 301 - Advanced Public Speaking

    (3)
    Integrates theory and development of advanced skill sets related to effective oral communication. Uses a variety of speaking assignments designed to provide a broad context for skill development.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
    Notes: Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 314 - Cross-Cultural Communication

    (3)
    Examines Issues, theories, research, and strategies related to developing effective communication practices between diverse cultures. Consideration of biblical principles related to peoples and issues within various cultural backgrounds and experiences.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 315 - Introduction to Public Relations

    (3)
    Introduces and develops a clear concept of public relations as a communication profession along with the necessary skills to become proficient in the field. Topics include the function of public relations in both public and private enterprises, the process of planning and implementing a public relations communication campaign, techniques for communicating with various publics, crisis communication, and the laws and ethics governing the practice of public relations.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 320 - Small Group Communication

    (3)
    Systematic study and practice of the principles of effective communication in groups; exploration of features unique to small group interaction including the exploration of public discussion formats.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
    Notes: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 351 - Communication Field Internship

    (3)
    Field experience in applied communication. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating careers in the communication field.

    Prerequisites: COM 103, COM 205, COM 215, and junior or senior status. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 352 - Communication Research Internship

    (3)
    Research experience in designing and implementing a research study. Students will analyze the results of their study and write a formal research report. Professional presentation of the study will be encouraged. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating graduate studies and needing academic presentation and publication experience.

    Prerequisites: COM 103, COM 225, and junior or senior status. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 360 - Persuasion

    (3)
    Offers a look at the nature of persuasive communication including strategies, applications, techniques and the use of propaganda, persuasive message construction, and audience adaptation are also examined. Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 403 - Organizational Communication

    (3)
    Integration of communication, management, and organizational theory; provides historical and contemporary vantage points of communication’s role in organizational operation.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
  
  •  

    COM 451 - Communication Field Internship

    (3)
    Field experience in applied communication. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating careers in the communication field.

    Prerequisites: COM 103, COM 205, COM 215, and junior or senior status. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 452 - Communication Research Internship

    (3)
    Research experience in designing and implementing a research study. Students will analyze the results of their study and write a formal research report. Professional presentation of the study will be encouraged. This course is especially valuable to those anticipating graduate studies and needing academic presentation and publication experience.

    Prerequisites: COM 103, COM 225, and junior or senior status. Pass/Fail
  
  •  

    COM 465 - Media Law

    (3)
    Study of major legal, ethical and policy issues related to the mass media. Special attention is directed toward constitutional issues associated with the First Amendment, shielding of sources, freedom of the press, and copyright and government regulations.

    Prerequisites: COM 103, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    COM 485 - Advanced Interpersonal Relations

    (3)
    Examination of a variety of communication variables related to issues of human interaction. Course content includes a discussion of the application of theory and faith to personal and professional relationships.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103, COM 210. CAGS Prerequisites: ENG 102
  
  •  

    COM 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3)
    Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Dean’s approval required. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 497 - Special Topics

    (1 to 3)
    Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    CUS Prerequisites: COM 103. CAGS Prerequisites: COM 110
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    COM 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1)
    Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Prerequisites: Communication major at sophomore level or above and permission of the instructor.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.

Computer Information Systems

  
  •  

    CIS 101 - Business Applications in Technology

    (3)
    A look at the history and use of the personal computer, with an emphasis upon current Microsoft products including MS Office. Students will gain skills in word processing, spreadsheet management, database management, web design, and presentation graphics. An emphasis will be placed on the use of technology in Business. A mastery of the materials and skills taught in this course is essential for success in most of the other courses in the School of Business and Leadership because the tools taught in this course are used extensively in the other courses.

  
  •  

    CIS 201 - Introduction to Computer Applications

    (3)
    A look at the history and use of the personal computer, with an emphasis upon current Microsoft products including MS Office. Students will gain skills in word processing, spreadsheet management, database management, web design, and presentation graphics. An emphasis will be placed on the use of technology in Business.

  
  •  

    CIS 260 - Computer Science Methodologies

    (3)
    Introduction to computing as a science, with an emphasis upon creating models of problems represented, manipulated, and solved by a computer. A programming language will be used to introduce the concepts of developing algorithms, data models, data structures, and object-oriented software engineering and programming approaches.

    CUS Prerequisites: CIS 201. CAGS Prerequisites: MIT 270, ENG 102, MAT 110 or higher.
  
  •  

    CIS 305 - Multimedia Design and Development

    (3)
    Experience developing desktop multimedia titles for information kiosks, self-running demonstrations, and interactive learning and training. Strong emphasis upon the multimedia development cycle for designing, developing, debugging, and distributing multimedia titles using industry-standard software. Topics include storyboarding, acquiring multimedia content (text, images, sound, video), and distribution and copyright issues. Students will design and develop a multimedia title as a course project.

    CUS Prerequisites: CIS 101, MIT 270 (CIS 260 is also highly recommended). CAGS Prerequisites: CIS 201.
  
  •  

    CIS 320 - Programming Foundations

    (3)
    A continuation of CIS 260 with an emphasis upon the program-development cycle, control structures, file organization, processing, numeric methods and conversions, and data access. Strong emphases upon design, structured and object-oriented programming principles, code development, and program documentation.

    Prerequisites: CIS 260.
  
  •  

    CIS 345 - Operating Systems

    (3)
    The study of the goals of operating systems and introduction to the resource allocation and control functions of operating systems, including parallel processing and primitives for synchronization. Introduction of ideas of virtual memory, paging, and the protection of shared and non-shared data, as well as the structures of files of data in secondary storage and security issues. Projects involving lectures on memory management policies, including virtual memory protection and sharing of information. Numerous models for implementation of various degrees of sharing and resource allocation are discussed in this class. Additional topics include the introduction to the resource allocation and control functions of network operating systems. Study will include the concepts and terminology used with industry standard operating systems.

    Prerequisites: CIS 201, MIT 270, (CIS 260 is also highly recommended).
  
  •  

    CIS 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12)
    Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
 

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