Academic Catalog 2015-2016 
    
    Aug 23, 2019  
Academic Catalog 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All CCU Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS) or the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS). Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program. In general, undergraduate course numbers (i.e. 100-499) ending in “A” are offered in the College of Adult and Graduate Studies. Undergraduate course numbers without the “A” ending are offered in the College of Undergraduate Studies.

 
  
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    EDU 497 - Student Teaching Seminar

    (2) Ongoing reflection on the Student  Teaching experience. Culminating review of proficiency on teacher standards including the Action Research Project and Teaching Evidence Log. Job seeking skills, mock interviews, and teacher licensure application. Overview of substitute and first year teaching expectations, teacher evaluation process, as well as professional goal setting.

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    EDU 497A - Student Teaching Seminar

    (1) This seminar offers the opportunity to conduct ongoing reflection on the teaching internship and group discussions of methods for improving as a teacher. This includes effective classroom management; assessment driven instruction; positive learning environments; proficient in Colorado P-12 Academic Standards; Performance-Based Standards for Colorado Teachers; and Teacher Quality Standards per Senate Bill10-191.

    Notes: This seminar is graded Pass/Fail.
  
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    EDU 500 - Curriculum and Instructional Design

    (3) Examination of curriculum and instructional design with respect to psychological, sociological, philosophical, pedagogical, and  foundations of andragogy.  Instructional Design is the intentional, systematic, and reflective process of developing principles of learning and instruction into plans for instructional materials, activities, information resources, and evaluation. Emphasis is -on application to curriculum development, as well as teaching and training settings.

    Prerequisites: EDU 548 , EDU 550 , EDU 560 .
  
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    EDU 502 - Principles of Effective Educational Leadership

    (3) This course provides an introduction to leadership theory while examining foundational principles necessary for effective teacher, district, and school leadership roles. Students apply a biblical worldview in the examination of professional dispositions needed to foster a shared vision within an educational setting.

  
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    EDU 505 - Psychological Foundations of Education

    (3) Explores the relationship between psychological theory and practice in education. Focus on the learner’s development from birth through adulthood with direct application to curriculum development and instruction.

  
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    EDU 507 - Organizational Culture in Academic Settings

    (3) This course presents core leadership traits applied to shaping culture within educational settings. Students explore collaboration, facilitation skills, designing and implementing change, and professional learning communities.

  
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    EDU 510 - Applications of Data in Decision Making

    (3) This course provides the opportunity to examine the foundations of educational assessment for administrative purposes. Students explore the uses of data to increase student achievement, inform teacher effectiveness, and increase accountability,

  
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    EDU 514 - Curiculum Math/Science Teaching in Elementary Education

    (2) Students research and evaluate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to elementary students. Candidates in this course will have the opportunity to design instructional materials. They are expected to research and identify strategies for presenting mathematical concepts. This course also provides students with opportunities to develop the skills to teach the scientific processes to elementary level students. Candidates are guided to use technology as well as designing lessons utilizing the Colorado Content Standards.

  
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    EDU 515 - Differentiation in the Elementary Classroom

    (3) This course explores the design, delivery, and implementation of differentiated curriculum and instruction for the spectrum of learners from disabled to gifted in the regular elementary classroom. (Includes 20 field hours)

  
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    EDU 520 - Studies in Education

    (3) Survey of current issues in the curriculum and instruction aspects of education. Readings and discussion cover theory, practice, principles, philosophy, trends, future directions, political and instructional aspects of education. Emphasis is on critical analysis and other process skills.

  
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    EDU 521 - Internship in Teaching I

    (3) The internship provides teachers in the Alternative Licensure Program support, teaching strategies and documentation of the Teacher Performance Standards required for teacher licensure. Participants will document 225 hours of professional development obtained at the university (CCU) and the partner school during the one-year period of employment as an Alternative Licensure teacher as required by Colorado law.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the School of Education.
  
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    EDU 522 - Internship in Teaching II

    (3) A continuation of EDU 521  and completion of the required 225 hours of professional development obtained at the university (CCU) and the partner school during the one-year period of employment as an Alternative Licensure teacher as required by Colorado law.

    Prerequisites: EDU 521 .
  
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    EDU 523 - Measurements and Evaluation

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes and Colorado State Standards. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current assessment practices are investigated.

  
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    EDU 524 - Curriculum: Reading/Language Arts/Literacy

    (2) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in elementary students. Includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on ability, learning styles, and attitudes; implementing assessment models; familiarization with the Colorado Content Standards

  
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    EDU 525 - Action Research Methods

    (3) This course focuses on best practices for action research in the school and in the classroom. Students explore assessment and evaluation related to curriculum design, lesson planning, and learning outcomes. Research is focused on student achievement and performance-based assessment as students learn to design research practices to make contributions to the field of education. (Includes 20 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 510 .
  
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    EDU 527 - Management of Educational Settings

    (3) This course presents the operational aspects of leadership that contribute to a positive learning environment. Topics include: facilities and classroom design, funding, master scheduling, safety and security, management of facilities and grounds, transportation and food service programs.

  
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    EDU 530 - Introduction to Online Learning

    (3) This course will examine the design and delivery of online classes in a variety of academic disciplines. Students will explore the basics of online course management, the concepts of a virtual classroom, and the basic technology tools for online instruction.

  
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    EDU 532 - Budget and Finance Management

    (3) This course provides a foundation for understanding finance including sources of revenue, accounting principles, charts of accounts, resource allocation, and other elements associated with managing both human and capital resources in an educational setting.

  
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    EDU 534 - Curriculum: Social Studies/Creative Arts in Elementary Education

    (2) Students plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to an elementary audience. Includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials appropriate for students; and includes the Colorado Model Content in Social Studies. This course explores research-based programs and approaches to teaching social studies and the creative arts in the elementary classroom.

  
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    EDU 536 - Mastering the Teaching of Adults

    (3) This course will examine the historical foundations of adults as unique learners and how this philosophy differs from the traditional methods of teaching. Students will explore the historical and philosophical aspects of education and critically analyze why intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to learn must be a planned, active process, requiring conscious and deliberate activities in diverse teaching environments.

  
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    EDU 538 - Training for Impact

    (3) This course will provide strategies and methodologies for implementing measurable, problem specific training and education which results in learning that impacts an organization. The course will develop students’ skills in integrating training and education with business needs, obtaining management support, and accurately measuring the results of the training or educational effort.

  
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    EDU 542 - Human Resource Leadership

    (3) This course provides key leadership concepts applied through human resources. Students investigate functions such as: employee recruitment and retention, teacher and staff observation and evaluation, mentoring, and professional development in order to increase the human capital of the educational setting.

  
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    EDU 543 - Management of Web Based Classes

    (3) This course is a hands-on application class which gives students practical experience in managing the basic components of an online class. The course covers the management of course content in a web-based shell as well as the management of the pacing and delivery of the course materials. .

  
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    EDU 544 - Student Assessment and Evaluation in Education

    (3) This course explores the role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated. (Includes 20 field hours)

  
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    EDU 545 - Curriculum & Instruction Online

    (3) This course explores various methods of developing the actual online course content and explores various techniques to move the initial course design from a text driven format to a dynamic, integrated online class. This course also examines various alternative design strategies for enhancing critical thinking and problem solving skills for a specific targeted audience.

  
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    EDU 546 - Cognition and Metacognition

    (3) This course will explore the differences in thinking strategies and help the teacher articulate a philosophy of teaching thinking skills in the classroom. This class will also include exposure to advanced integrating technology into a classroom technique as well as engaging teachers to develop alternative methods of integrating thinking skills into a curriculum.

  
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    EDU 548 - Needs Assessment and Evaluation

    (3) This course is an overview of assessment and evaluation as it pertains to Curriculum and Instruction, with emphasis on Practicum design. Consideration is given to evaluation terminology and approaches. An interactive forum provides for discussion of alternative assessment practices.

    Prerequisites: EDU 550 .
  
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    EDU 550 - Research and Analysis Seminar

    (3) The intent of this course is to develop graduate students into intelligent consumers of educational research through the exploration of a variety of research designs and methodologies, analysis of existing research toward practical application, and overview of the capstone research process. Emphasis is on proposal development, capstone design, and steps necessary for completing the MACI capstone.

  
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    EDU 552 - Web Based Design

    (3) This course is designed as a practical application class where the student learns how to effectively use the basic tools in a web based class. Students will populate an actual Learning Management System shell and explore methods for effectively presenting their course materials, promoting interaction between students, and testing the viability of their course design.

  
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    EDU 555 - Instructional Leadershlp

    (3) This course examines curriculum design and the development of institutional professional development plans. Students learn to apply a continuous improvement model to improve teaching and learning in educational settings.

  
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    EDU 556 - Alternative Teaching Methodologies

    (3) The topics covered in this class will help instructors and trainers develop a higher level of competency in the teaching-learning process through research, practical application workshops, and online seminars. This course will expand students’ skills in adapting to the changing needs of learners through development of individualized alternative teaching methods.

  
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    EDU 560 - Instructional Methodologies

    (3) A survey of curriculum design and instructional methodologies with emphasis on planning learning experiences utilizing instructional models to facilitate positive student achievement in a variety of educational settings.

    Prerequisites: EDU 548 EDU 550 .
  
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    EDU 562 - Ethics and School Law

    (3) This course is an overview of state and federal law pertaining to education. Students examine current policies and legal issues including educator liability, equity and access. Standards for ethical and professional conduct are presented.

  
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    EDU 564 - Stakeholder Engagement

    (3) This course examines successful models for school, parent, and community partnerships to promote success for all learners, Students identify various stakeholders within local, regional and state-wide systems and their role in promoting and supporting school improvement.

  
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    EDU 565 - Differentiated Instruction

    (3) The purpose of this course is to introduce and explore the concept of differentiated instruction. Students will explore research-based readings, practical ideas, and hands on activities that will allow them to create a differentiated learning environment.

  
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    EDU 570 - Teaching Internship

    (2) Teacher candidates must begin a student teaching professional internship which will bring school-based clock hours to the state required minimum of 800 hours in an elementary school setting. Includes proficiency in classroom management; an application of action research applied to the first three sections of Teacher Work Sample; demonstration of professional relationships; proficiency in lesson planning; demonstration of professional adaptability; data driven instruction. (Includes 80 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 606, EDU 515.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  
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    EDU 571 - Student Teaching

    (6) Teaching candidates must successfully complete the student teaching internship and have logged a minimum of 800 school-based clock hours. At the end of Student Teaching, candidates must have demonstrated proficiency on each of the forty-five Colorado Teacher Performance Standards. (Includes 640 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 570
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  
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    EDU 575 - Managing Educational Change

    (3) This course explores the critical role of leadership in managing educational change, including emerging standards, policy, and regulations, Students explore approaches to managing school improvement and reform with applications such as conflict management, action planning, and problem solving.

  
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    EDU 580 - Integrating Technology into Education

    (3) An overview of current educational technology. Explores the historical and philosophical underpinnings of technology and gives examples of integrating technology into teaching and training, including software, hardware, and multimedia. Students develop instructional plans that effectively apply and integrate educational technology into curriculum development.

  
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    EDU 582 - Communications and Visual Literacy

    (3) In this class students will develop the set of skills necessary for the interpretation, criticism, and selection of numerous types of images toward the goal of creating and using images to enhance communication in any learning environment. This course combines art history, psychology, philosophy, information design and graphic design with computer interface usability.

  
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    EDU 602 - Implications of Brain Research for Education

    (3) This course is a survey of brain research with an emphasis on how it impacts teaching and learning. The course focuses on evaluating current brain research and formulating plans to incorporate appropriate strategies or changes into instructional settings. Awareness of current research and how to access the latest findings will be reinforced and expanded through classroom projects and readings.

  
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    EDU 603 - Advanced Special Needs Strategies

    (3) This graduate level course is designed to help education students understand the integration of exceptional children and adolescents into the regular educational environment in accord with federal and state laws pertaining to exceptional children. The needs of exceptional children are no longer the responsibility of special education, but a shared responsibility of regular education teachers, a team of specialists, parents and family. In order for regular teachers to meet their responsibility, they need to understand and apply knowledge of child development, identification and assessment procedures of exceptional children, adapting and designing educational interventions, and communication strategies with exceptional students, school team members, and parents. The ultimate goal is to provide the very best learning environment for the exceptional student to achieve his/her maximum learning potential.

  
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    EDU 606 - Advanced Techniques in Classroom Management

    (3) This pedagogical course prepares professional educators to: provide instructional management consistent with various age groups and be responsive to the intellectual, physical, emotional and social needs of the learner. Course content examines major schools of thought and dominant variables involved in classroom management, motivation and discipline. Students learn practical techniques of organizing and arranging classroom experiences to maximize learning. Students will understand the direct relationship of planning, teaching, student learning, reflection and professional growth. (Includes 20 field hours)

  
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    EDU 625 - Issues in Education

    (3) This course is a survey of current issues in the curriculum and instruction aspects of education. Readings and discussion cover theory, practice, philosophy, trends, future directions, political, and instructional aspects of education. Emphasis is on critical analysis and other process skills.

  
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    EDU 651 - Capstone

    (3) The capstone project of the MACI program allows for a range of meaningful student projects with integration of research and analysis, needs assessment and evaluation, instructional methodologies, curriculum design or an alternative plan paper.  It is designed for each student to make application within their professional or personal setting.  The final capstone product is designed to assess student analysis and synthesis of research to a practical application product.  The course is offered online for one semester.

    Prerequisites: EDU 500 , EDU 548 , EDU 550 , EDU 560 .
  
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    EDU 681 - Applications of Interactive Technology

    (3) This course is intended to give educators looking at being Web savvy an online opportunity to explore the many tools that the “New” web offers and explore how they can make a difference in their classroom. This will be as robust and meaningful to each student as possible.

  
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    EDU 691 - Capstone

    (3) This final course assimilates and integrates the student’s readings, discussions and experiences in the Master of Education program. Students complete an action research project applied to their roles as educational leaders.

    Prerequisites: EDU 525 .
    Notes: Grade of B- or higher required.
  
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    ENG 100A - Basic Composition I

    (3) This course focuses on the essential grammatical features of the written English language. Topics in this course include parts of speech, punctuation, sentence structure, and capitalization. The student must pass this course with a C- or better to fulfill prerequisite for ENG 101A .

    Notes: This course does not fulfill any communication general education requirement. However, the course may be used to satisfy general elective requirements.
    For the English Composition sequence, please see English Composition and Adult Studies .
  
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    ENG 101A - Basic Composition II

    (3) This course focuses on the writing process. Topics in this course include the paragraph development (including introductions, conclusions, and thesis statements) and the development of basic essays. The student must pass the course with a C- or better to fulfill prerequisite for ENG 102A .

    Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 101A or successful completion of ENG 100A  (C-) or better.
    Notes: This course does not fulfill any communication general education requirement. However, the course may be used to satisfy general elective requirements.
    For the English Composition sequence, please see English Composition and Adult Studies .
  
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    ENG 102 - English Composition

    (3) Effective use of the English language and exploration of rhetorical modes in written composition. Review of structure, purpose, and audience awareness in developing essays.

    Prerequisites: ACT and/or SAT scores will be used to determine placement in either ENG 102 or ENG 102 (Basic).
    Notes: Course must be completed first semester at CCU.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semester.
  
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    ENG 102A - English Composition

    (3) This course focuses on the effective use of the English language and exploration of rhetorical modes in written composition. Structure, purpose, and audience awareness in developing essays is addressed.

    Prerequisites: Place in ENG 102A or successful completion of ENG 101A  (C-) or better.
    Notes: Course should be completed prior to the completion of 60 credit hours.
    For the English Composition sequence, please see English Composition and Adult Studies .
  
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    ENG 104 - Research Writing

    (3) Development of skills in research and writing of formal academic papers: critical thinking, argumentation, and documentation.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in ENG 102 . Course should be completed prior to the completion of 60 credit hours.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ENG 104A - Research Writing

    (3) This course focuses on the development and strengthening skills of effective business and professional communication in both written and oral modes. The course includes heavy emphases on effective research and the process of writing with a particular focus on both academic and business writing. Development of skills in research and writing of formal academic papers: critical thinking, argumentation, and documentation.

    Prerequisites: Course should be completed prior to the completion of 60 credit hours.
  
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    ENG 105 - Advanced English Composition

    (3) Advanced English composition and research methods for invited exceptional students. Focus on the art of the essay.

    Prerequisites: One of the following:

    • Score of 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition exam,
    • Score of 3 on the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam,
    • Score of 30 or above on the verbal section of the ACT exam,
    • Score of 700 or above on the verbal section of the SAT exam,
    • By invitation of the English department.

    Notes: Fulfills general education requirements for ENG 102  and ENG 104 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ENG 166 - University Publications: Paragon

    (1 to 2) Editing, designing, and producing student literary/arts magazine. Variable credit, depending upon responsibility.

    Notes: Repeatable for credit for a maximum of 8 total credits toward graduation.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ENG 201 - Introduction to Literature

    (3) Understand, experience, and evaluate poetry, short fiction, essays, and drama genres, both American and multinational.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 102  or equivalent.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    ENG 201A - Introduction to Literature

    (3) Understand, experience, and evaluate poetry, short fiction, essays, and drama genres, both American and multinational.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 102A  or equivalent.
  
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    ENG 202 - American Literature I

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and documents in American literature from the Colonial era to the early Republic (1776-1830) through the Romantic-transcendentalist period (1830-1860). Includes readings from multiethnic and women writers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104  or equivalent.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ENG 202A - American Literature I

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and documents in American literature from the Colonial era to the early Republic (1776-1830) through the Romantic-transcendentalist period (1830-1860). Includes readings from multiethnic and women writers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104A  or equivalent.
  
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    ENG 203 - American Literature II

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and drama in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Nontraditional ethnic and women’s voices included. Emphasis on interpretation and criticism of American literature.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104  or equivalent.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ENG 203A - American Literature II

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and drama in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Nontraditional ethnic and women’s voices included. Emphasis on interpretation and criticism of American literature.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104A  or equivalent.
  
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    ENG 204 - British Literature I

    (3) Surveys the history of literature in Britain until 1800 and representative works by influential writers of the periods contained therein.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104  or equivalent.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ENG 205 - British Literature II

    (3) Surveys the history of literature in Britain from 1800 to the present and representative works by influential writers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104  or equivalent.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ENG 230 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    (3) Study and practice the methods, structures, and conventions of fiction and poetry.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102  or permission of the instructor.
    When Offered
    Fall and spring semester.
  
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    ENG 305 - Poetry Seminar

    (3) Interpretation and critical reading, structures, and conventions of poetry in English, past and present.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: ENG 201 , ENG 202 , ENG 203 , ENG 204 , or ENG 205 .
    When Offered
    Odd fall semesters.
  
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    ENG 310 - The History of the Novel in English

    (3) Representative novels from various historical periods depicting human responses to differing economic, political, psychological, and social issues. Interpretation and criticism of the novel genre.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    ENG 330 - Shakespeare

    (3) Analysis of literary and performance techniques for selected Shakespeare plays.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: ENG 201 , ENG 202 , ENG 203 , ENG 204  or ENG 205 .
    When Offered
    Even spring semesters.
    Cross-listed THR 330 .
  
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    ENG 340 - American Ethnic Literatures

    (3) Multi-genre works by major writers from American ethnic traditions and their theoretical and critical foundations.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: ENG 201 , ENG 202 , ENG 203 , ENG 204  or ENG 205 .
    When Offered
    Even fall semesters.
  
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    ENG 350 - Internship

    (1 to 12) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Notes: Junior standing Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ENG 360 - World Literature

    (3) Multinational works of contemporary literature in English translation. Central human dilemmas and the role of literature in other societies.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: ENG 201 , ENG 202 , ENG 203 , ENG 204  or ENG 205 .
    When Offered
    Odd fall semesters.
  
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    ENG 380 - Christian Writers

    (3) Foundational literary works by Christian writers: their scriptural, historical, and cultural influences, from the medieval period to the present.

    Prerequisites: One of the following: ENG 201 , ENG 202 , ENG 203 , ENG 204  or ENG 205 .
    When Offered
    Even spring semesters.
  
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    ENG 390 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ENG 408 - Seminar in Literary Topics

    (3) This seminar provides a variety of literary topics for analysis and discussion. Previous Seminars in Literary Topics have been on Russian Literature, The Romantics, and Conversations with the Classics where great works of literature have been re-imagined through novel, story or film.

    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status.
    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ENG 410 - History and Structure of the English Language

    (3) The development of English, with special emphasis on the relationship of language development to cultural background and environment; standard and non-standard dialect usage; grammatical structure.

    Prerequisites: Three of the following courses: ENG 305 , ENG 310 , ENG 330 , ENG 340 , ENG 360 , or ENG 380 .
    Fee
    Fees may apply.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ENG 420 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

    (3) Technique, writing practice, and criticism.

    Prerequisites: ENG 230  or permission of the instructor.
    When Offered
    Even fall semesters.
  
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    ENG 430 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

    (3) Technique, writing practice, and criticism. Publishing guidelines.

    Prerequisites: ENG 230  or permission of the instructor.
    When Offered
    Odd spring semesters.
  
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    ENG 435 - Advanced Creative Writing: Special Topics

    (3) Technique, writing practice, and criticism. Publishing guidelines.

    Prerequisites: ENG 230  or permission of the instructor.
    Notes: Topics will vary based on student interest and faculty availability.
  
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    ENG 440 - Literary Criticism

    (3) Identification of critical issues and key works in the history of literary study in English.

    Prerequisites: Two of the following: ENG 305 , ENG 310 , ENG 330 , ENG 340 , ENG 360 , or ENG 380 .
    When Offered
    Odd fall semesters.
  
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    ENG 450 - Internship

    (3-6) Supervised experience in a professional setting.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.
    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    No more than 3 credit hours of an internship can be applied toward the major.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ENG 470 - Senior Thesis

    (3) The Senior Thesis is a substantial body of work that may be research, expository, critical, or creative work. It is original in subject matter, organization, or view. An interested student should begin discussions with a thesis advisor in the semester or summer before enrolling. The thesis typically will begin in the fall semester of the senior year and be completed in the following spring semester. Credits are awarded in the semester in which the thesis is completed.

    Prerequisites: Seniors within the major, 3.5 GPA (minimum cumulative), and thesis advisor permission.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ENG 490 - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with faculty.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ENG 497 - Special Topics

    (3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior status.
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    ENG 497A - Special Topics

    (3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior status.
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ENG 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    ENT 270A - Entrepreneurship as Mission - From Idea to Market

    (3) Entrepreneurship is the driver of innovation in business today, whether in a new venture, within a corporation or on the mission field. This course is an overview of entrepreneurship with a perspective of purpose and mission for the new venture that can be greater than profits alone. Included are idea generation, social and sustainable entrepreneurship; planning, financing and marketing for the new venture.

  
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    ENT 320A - Starting and Running your Business

    (3) Students will work in teams that compete within the retail industry via an entrepreneurship simulation game over the course of the class. Students learn by doing from start-up to the first years of business making decisions about research and development, location, marketing, production and operations, human resources, finance and total quality management.

  
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    ENT 330A - Social, Sustainable and Mission Entrepreneurship

    (3) Entrepreneurs and existing companies are realizing that there are intangible benefits to entrepreneurship with a purpose that is greater than just the bottom line. This course explores enterprising entrepreneurial ventures all over the world, highlighting social, sustainable and mission-oriented entrepreneurs with innovative, big ideas. Students will explore how an entrepreneurial venture can be a vehicle for their own purpose in life.

  
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    ENT 340A - Entrepreneurial Growth - The Next Level

    (3) Students expand their application of entrepreneurial skills through a business growth simulation of a manufacturing firm within a given industry. Research and development, marketing, production, finance, human resource management and continuous quality improvement decisions all come into play as student teams compete and seek entrepreneurial growth for their companies.

  
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    EPS 340 - Child Psychology and Development

    (3) The educator’s role in recognizing, evaluating and guiding the cognitive, physical, psychosocial and emotional growth patterns and characteristics from infants to early, middle and late childhood, as well as adolescence.

    When Offered
    Fall and spring semesters.
  
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    EPS 342 - Adolescent Development and Culture

    (3) Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral growth and development of early, middle and late adolescents. Explores theories of adolescent development in a family, peer, school, and community context. Explores personal, educational and career decision making, psychosocial problems during adolescence, and implications for teaching, youth ministry, counseling, and nonprofit organization work with youth.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing (30+ Credit Hours).
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    EPS 390 - Ind/Directed Study

    (3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    EPS 498 - Teaching Assistantship

    (1 to 2) Supervised and limited preparation and delivery of lectures, tutoring of students, laboratory preparation, and assisting in the preparation and grading of examinations.

    Notes: Pass/Fail; may be repeated for credit.
  
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    FIN 301 - Business Finance

    (3) Practical overview of relevant foundational aspects of business finance such as the role of the finance manager, risk-return, time value of money, ratio analysis, and financing decisions; basic application of these principles to the business environment.

    Prerequisites: ACC 202 .
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    FIN 307 - The Personal Financial Planner

    (3) This course is designed to provide the student with a practical understanding of the field of financial planning and prepare the student for an entry level position with a financial planning firm. It is designed to prepare the student to begin studying for the CFP designation.

    Prerequisites: BUS 101  or MGT 101 , ACC 201 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    FIN 320 - Investments & Portfolio Management

    (3) Survey of security analysis and valuation, portfolio management, and licensing and regulation of security markets. Class enrollment may be strictly limited; recommendation of student’s advisor may be required.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    FIN 410 - Advanced Topics in Business Finance

    (3) Practical overview of relevant foundational aspects of business finance such as the role of the finance manager, risk-return, time value of money, ratio analysis, and financing decisions; basic application of these principles to the business environment. This course will also examine tactical and strategic financing decisions as well as working capital management and special topics such as reorganization, liquidation, mergers, divestitures, LBO’s, bankruptcy, and multinational financial management.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 .
    When Offered
    Scheduled by School.
  
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    FIN 411 - Financial Management Strategies

    (3) The objective of this course will be to teach business students practical applications of financial management techniques using the principles and theory covered in their core business courses.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 , LAW 303 .
    When Offered
    Every spring semester.
  
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    FIN 500 - Financial Institutions

    (3) This course will cover concepts of business finance, corporate global treasury operations, financial institution issues, financial instrument uses and valuations, along with risk-return concepts, and risk hedging with derivative securities, plus recent problems concerning how financial abuses may have impacted the U.S. and global economies with the Great Recession.

    Prerequisites: FIN 301 , LAW 303 , Juniors and Seniors only.
    When Offered
    Every fall semester.
  
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    FIN 501 - Financial Foundations

    (3) This course will cover the foundational concepts of business finance including the time value of money, security pricing and valuations, portfolio risk and return and derivative securities.

    Prerequisites: Undergraduate-level accounting and either finance or economics.
  
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    FNS 220A - Introduction to Nutrition

    (3) This theory course is an introduction to the science of human nutrition. The role of nutrients in supporting human function and preventing disease throughout the lifespan is emphasized. In addition, principles of nutrition are applied to dietary planning.

 

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