Academic Catalog 2018-2019 
    
    Jan 21, 2019  
Academic Catalog 2018-2019

CAGS Course Descriptions


Note: Certain courses may be offered only through the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (CAGS) or the College of Undergraduate Studies (CUS . Students should refer to their specific degree program in the Catalog or consult their academic advisor to confirm which courses are available in their program.

College of Adult and Graduate Studies

Courses

Early Childhood Education

  •  

    ECE 201A - Teaching as a Profession

    (3) This course is an introduction to the teaching profession, the function of public and private schools, and the meaning of being a teacher. Includes exploration of child growth and development, developmentally appropriate practices, family and community relationships, the responsibilities of professional educators, and personal philosophies of education.

  •  

    ECE 205A - Health, Safety and Nutrition for ECE

    (3) This course studies the components of an appropriate school health program and the role of the early childhood educator. In addition, it focuses on the ability to create, select, and evaluate developmentally and functionally appropriate health materials, methods, equipment and environments. Emphasis is placed on integrating school, family, and community resources to insure sound health promotion for early childhood education.

  •  

    ECE 214A - Field I: Standards-Based Planning

    (2) This is the first of two field experiences that provide candidates the opportunity to apply what they are learning in their program courses to a school-based setting. This course is the candidate’s introduction to the teaching profession. It includes defining the context of learning through classroom observation and developing skills in selecting, teaching and evaluating learning of objectives.  This course requires a minimum of 60 student contact hours in a CAGS-approved school setting. There is a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course. Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    ECE 216A - Human Resources for ECE

    (3) The focus of this course is on the human relations component of an ECE Administrator’s responsibilities. Topics include communication, director-staff relationships, parent involvement, staff development and leadership.

    Notes: (A 10-hour practicum is included).
  •  

    ECE 226A - Administration of ECE

    (3) This course examines Colorado’s minimal licensing requirements, as well as optimal standards pertaining to the operation of programs for young children. It includes a focus on the human relations component of an early childhood professional’s responsibilities. Course content focuses on new directors’ administrative skills and administration from a teacher’s perspective. Legislation, standards, program planning and practical aspects of financing, administration, supervision, and management are explored.

    Notes: (A 10-hour practicum is included).
  •  

    ECE 314A - Curriculum: Mathematics/Science

    (3) Students research and evaluate developmentally appropriate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to early childhood students. This includes designing appropriate instructional materials; identifying strategies for presenting math and science concepts and processes; effective use of technology; utilizing Colorado Math and Science Standards to develop strategic math and science instruction.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    ECE 324A - Curriculum: Reading/Language Arts/Literacy

    (3) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in students (Birth to 8). Includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on academic and affective readiness; implementing assessment models.

  •  

    ECE 334A - Curriculum: Social Studies/Creative Arts

    (3) Students plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to students (birth to 8). This includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials and learning experiences appropriate for students (birth to 8).

  •  

    ECE 340A - Assessment and Measurement

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated.

  •  

    ECE 401A - Classroom and Instructional Management

    (3) This course explores appropriate and developmentally sensitive strategies for managing behavior in typically and atypically developing early childhood students. Includes appropriate instructional management strategies; appropriate responses to the intellectual, emotional and social needs of each learner; models for guiding and managing student behavior; identifying strategies for the development of intrinsic motivation; strategies for enhancing pro-social behavior.

  •  

    ECE 403A - Special Needs Methods

    (3) This course will help early childhood educators develop teaching strategies to provide an appropriate education for children with special needs. Includes applying knowledge of child development; assessment procedures of special needs children; educational interventions and communication strategies with special needs students; understanding educational or behavioral adaptations for exceptional children; and understanding the “inclusion” model for educating special needs students.

  •  

    ECE 414A - Field II: Strategic Instruction

    (2) This course focuses on strategic instructional methods and effective techniques for teaching children in diverse early childhood settings. This includes standards-based lesson plans; evidence-based curriculum design and field-proven instructional methods.  The course explores the influence of government agencies; role of the local school and school district in establishing culture and protocols; and history and mission of Christian education as they each relate to philosophies of education. This course includes a minimum of 70 contact hours in a CAGS-approved school setting. There are a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

    Prerequisites: ECE 214A .
    Notes: Under certain circumstances and at the discretion of the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction Education, students may be required to retake ECE 414A based on prior academic performance and/or the length of time since completing the first attempt. No student may retake ECE 414A more than one additional time.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    ECE 470A - Student Teaching

    (9) This course is a professional internship where ECE candidates will invest the remainder of the 800 required practicum clock hours for Colorado licensure in a CAGS-approved school setting.  Under the guidance, support and observation of a CCU CAGS university supervisor and a licensed classroom cooperating teacher, candidates will be gradually released into full responsibility of a classroom of learners. There is a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

    Prerequisites: ECE 414A .
    Fee
    Fees apply.
  •  

    ECE 497A - Student Teaching Seminar

    (2) This seminar offers the opportunity to conduct ongoing reflection on the teaching internship and group discussions of methods for improving as a teacher. This includes effective classroom management, assessment driven instruction, positive learning environments, and sensitive diversity issues in the modern public school environment.  It is a live (synchronous webinar as necessary for online students) class and is critical to the successful launch of the Student Teaching experience.

    Notes: This seminar is graded Pass/Fail.

Economics

  •  

    ECO 215A - Economics

    (3) This course is designed to provide the adult learner with the scope and structure of economic principles and their effect on the business enterprise. The distinction between macroeconomics and microeconomics, their relationship to each other and their combined effect on the business sector will be the focus of the course. The adult learner is expected to develop an understanding of the various economic systems, their differences, and the basic elements of a free market economy and the determination of price in a free market economy.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  •  

    ECO 390A - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  •  

    ECO 490A - Directed Study

    (1 to 3) Guided independent investigation of a topic selected in consultation with the major or minor advisor.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Notes: See Academic Policies for guidelines. Graded; may be repeated for credit.
  •  

    ECO 601 - Economic Analysis and Policy

    (3) This course is designed to examine the impact of macroeconomic influences. Determinants of trade balances, inflation and employment rates, and monetary/fiscal policy in economic growth are assessed. Attention is given to descriptive and normative aspects of economic structure and growth within the context of bi-national and multi-national agreements.

Education

  •  

    EDU 201A - Teaching as a Profession

    (3) This course is an introduction to the teaching profession, the function of public and private schools, and the meaning of being a teacher. Includes exploration of child growth and development, developmentally appropriate practices, family and community relationships, the responsibilities of professional educators, and personal philosophies of education.

  •  

    EDU 214A - Field I: Standards-Based Planning

    (2) This is the first of two field experiences that provide candidates the opportunity to apply what they are learning in their program courses to a school-based setting. This course is the candidate’s introduction to the teaching profession. It includes defining the context of learning through classroom observation and developing skills in selecting, teaching and evaluating learning of objectives.  This course requires a minimum of 60 student contact hours in a CAGS-approved elementary school setting. There is a limited number of synchronous activities in this course.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 314A - Curriculum: Mathematics/Science

    (3) Candidates research and evaluate developmentally appropriate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to elementary students. This includes designing appropriate instructional materials; identifying strategies for presenting math and science concepts and processes; effective use of technology; utilizing Colorado Math and Science Standards to develop strategic math and science instruction.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 324A - Curriculum: Reading/Language Arts/Literacy

    (3) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in elementary students. Includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on academic and affective readiness; implementing assessment models.

  •  

    EDU 334A - Curriculum: Social Studies/Creative Arts

    (3) Candidates plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to an elementary audience. This includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials and learning experiences appropriate for elementary students.

  •  

    EDU 340A - Assessment and Measurement

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated.

  •  

    EDU 401A - Classroom and Instructional Management

    (3) This course explores appropriate and developmentally sensitive strategies for managing behavior in typically and atypically developing elementary children. Includes appropriate instructional management strategies; appropriate responses to the intellectual, emotional and social needs of each learner; models for guiding and managing student behavior; identifying strategies for the development of intrinsic motivation; strategies for enhancing pro-social behavior.

  •  

    EDU 403A - Special Needs Methods

    (3) This course will help elementary educators develop teaching strategies to provide an appropriate education for children with special needs. Includes applying knowledge of child development; assessment procedures of special needs children; educational interventions and communication strategies with special needs students; understanding educational or behavioral adaptations for exceptional children; understanding the “inclusion” model for educating special needs students.

  •  

    EDU 414A - Field II: Strategic Instruction

    (2) This course focuses on strategic instructional methods and effective techniques for teaching children in diverse elementary settings. This includes standards-based lesson plans; evidence-based curriculum design and field-proven instructional methods.  The course explores the influence of government agencies; role of the local school and school district in establishing culture and protocols; and history and mission of Christian education as they each relate to philosophies of education. This course includes a minimum of 70 contact hours in a CAGS-approved school setting. There are a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

    Prerequisites: EDU 214A .
    Notes: Under certain circumstances and at the discretion of the Dean of Curriculum and Instruction Education, students may be required to retake EDU 414A based on prior academic performance and/or the length of time since completing the first attempt. No student may retake EDU 414A more than one additional time.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 470A - Student Teaching

    (9) This course is a professional internship where Elementary Education candidates will invest the remainder of the 800 required practicum clock hours for Colorado licensure in a CAGS-approved elementary school setting.  Under the guidance, support and observation of a CCU CAGS university supervisor and a licensed classroom cooperating teacher, candidates will be gradually released into full responsibility of an elementary classroom. There is a limited number of synchronous class sessions required in this course.  Online students participate in these sessions via webinar.

    Prerequisites: EDU 414A .
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 497A - Student Teaching Seminar

    (2) This seminar offers the opportunity to conduct ongoing reflection on the teaching internship and group discussions of methods for improving as a teacher. This includes effective classroom management, assessment driven instruction, positive learning environments, and sensitive diversity issues in the modern public school environment.  It is a live (synchronous webinar as necessary for online students) class and is critical to the successful launch of the Student Teaching experience.

    Notes: This seminar is graded Pass/Fail.
  •  

    EDU 500 - Curriculum and Instructional Design

    (3) Examination of curriculum and instructional design with respect to psychological, sociological, philosophical, pedagogical, and foundations of andragogy.  Instructional Design is the intentional, systematic, and reflective process of developing principles of learning and instruction into plans for instructional materials, activities, information resources, and evaluation. Emphasis is on application to curriculum development, as well as teaching and training settings. Students will learn how to apply multiple research approaches to diverse field-specific settings. The final project in this course will be a proposal that will be completed in the EDU 651  Capstone course.

    Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in all major coursework.
  •  

    EDU 502 - Principles of Effective Educational Leadership

    (3) This course provides an introduction to leadership theory while examining foundational principles necessary for effective teacher, district, and school leadership roles. Students apply a biblical worldview in the examination of professional dispositions needed to foster a shared vision within an educational setting.

  •  

    EDU 505 - Psychological Foundations of Education

    (3) Explores the relationship between psychological theory and practice in education. Focus on the learner’s development from birth through adulthood with direct application to curriculum development and instruction.

  •  

    EDU 507 - Organizational Culture in Academic Settings

    (3) This course presents core leadership traits applied to shaping culture within educational settings. Students explore collaboration, facilitation skills, designing and implementing change, and professional learning communities.

  •  

    EDU 510 - Applications of Data in Decision Making

    (3) This course provides the opportunity to examine the foundations of educational assessment for administrative purposes. Students explore the uses of data to increase student achievement, inform teacher effectiveness, and increase accountability,

  •  

    EDU 514 - Curiculum Math/Science Teaching in Elementary Education

    (2) Students research and evaluate concepts, methods, and materials necessary to teach mathematics and science to elementary students. Candidates in this course will have the opportunity to design instructional materials. They are expected to research and identify strategies for presenting mathematical concepts. This course also provides students with opportunities to develop the skills to teach the scientific processes to elementary level students. Candidates are guided to use technology as well as designing lessons utilizing the Colorado Content Standards.

  •  

    EDU 515 - Differentiation in the Elementary Classroom

    (3) This course explores the design, delivery, and implementation of differentiated curriculum and instruction for the spectrum of learners from disabled to gifted in the regular elementary classroom. (Includes 20 field hours)

  •  

    EDU 520 - Studies in Education

    (3) Survey of current issues in the curriculum and instruction aspects of education. Readings and discussion cover theory, practice, principles, philosophy, trends, future directions, political and instructional aspects of education. Emphasis is on critical analysis and other process skills.

  •  

    EDU 521 - Internship in Teaching I

    (3) The internship provides teachers in the Alternative Licensure Program support, teaching strategies and documentation of the Teacher Performance Standards required for teacher licensure. Participants will document 225 hours of professional development obtained at the university (CCU) and the partner school during the one-year period of employment as an Alternative Licensure teacher as required by Colorado law.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 522 - Internship in Teaching II

    (3) A continuation of EDU 521  and completion of the required 225 hours of professional development obtained at the university (CCU) and the partner school during the one-year period of employment as an Alternative Licensure teacher as required by Colorado law.

    Prerequisites: EDU 521 .
  •  

    EDU 523 - Measurements and Evaluation

    (3) The role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes and Colorado State Standards. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current assessment practices are investigated.

  •  

    EDU 524 - Curriculum: Reading/Language Arts/Literacy

    (2) This course builds knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading, language arts, and literacy in elementary students. Includes identifying cuing systems in written language; planning appropriate instruction for emergent, beginning, and transitional/fluent literacy learners; strategies to meet students’ needs based on ability, learning styles, and attitudes; implementing assessment models; familiarization with the Colorado Content Standards

  •  

    EDU 525 - Action Research Methods

    (3) This course focuses on best practices for action research in the school and in the classroom. Students explore assessment and evaluation related to curriculum design, lesson planning, and learning outcomes. Research is focused on student achievement and performance-based assessment as students learn to design research practices to make contributions to the field of education. (Includes 20 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 510 .
  •  

    EDU 526 - Professional Ethics in Education

    (3) Integration of personal, social, and professional ethics; emphasis on ethical theories, virtues, and values as a basis for professional ethical decision making, institutional administration, professional relationships, and teaching ethical decision making for K-12, corporate training, and university environments.  

  •  

    EDU 527 - Management of Educational Settings

    (3) This course presents the operational aspects of leadership that contribute to a positive learning environment. Topics include: facilities and classroom design, funding, master scheduling, safety and security, management of facilities and grounds, transportation and food service programs.

  •  

    EDU 530 - Introduction to Online Learning

    (3) This course will examine the design and delivery of online classes in a variety of academic disciplines. Students will explore the basics of online course management, the concepts of a virtual classroom, and the basic technology tools for online instruction.

  •  

    EDU 532 - Budget and Finance Management

    (3) This course provides a foundation for understanding finance including sources of revenue, accounting principles, charts of accounts, resource allocation, and other elements associated with managing both human and capital resources in an educational setting.

  •  

    EDU 534 - Curriculum: Social Studies/Creative Arts in Elementary Education

    (2) Students plan and evaluate appropriate concepts, strategies and materials necessary to teach creative arts and social studies to an elementary audience. Includes integrating content in art, drama, and movement; identifying appropriate social studies concepts; articulating the democratic ideal to students; translating knowledge from history into materials appropriate for students; and includes the Colorado Model Content in Social Studies. This course explores research-based programs and approaches to teaching social studies and the creative arts in the elementary classroom.

  •  

    EDU 536 - Mastering the Teaching of Adults

    (3) This course will examine the historical foundations of adults as unique learners and how this philosophy differs from the traditional methods of teaching. Students will explore the historical and philosophical aspects of education and critically analyze why intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to learn must be a planned, active process, requiring conscious and deliberate activities in diverse teaching environments.

  •  

    EDU 538 - Training for Impact

    (3) This course will provide strategies and methodologies for implementing measurable, problem specific training and education which results in learning that impacts an organization. The course will develop students’ skills in integrating training and education with business needs, obtaining management support, and accurately measuring the results of the training or educational effort.

  •  

    EDU 540 - Theories of Language, Learning and Teaching

    (3) This course is an introduction to theories that are the foundation of second language learning and teaching, their review, and applications for the designing of classroom learning and the teaching experiences

  •  

    EDU 542 - Human Resource Leadership

    (3) This course provides key leadership concepts applied through human resources. Students investigate functions such as: employee recruitment and retention, teacher and staff observation and evaluation, mentoring, and professional development in order to increase the human capital of the educational setting.

  •  

    EDU 543 - Management of Web Based Classes

    (3) This course is a hands-on application class which gives students practical experience in managing the basic components of an online class. The course covers the management of course content in a web-based shell as well as the management of the pacing and delivery of the course materials. .

  •  

    EDU 544 - Student Assessment and Evaluation in Education

    (3) This course explores the role of assessment and evaluation in the instructional process, with emphasis on practical application to learning outcomes. Performance-based assessment, assessment procedures, reflective practices, and other current practices are investigated. (Includes 20 field hours)

  •  

    EDU 545 - Curriculum & Instruction Online

    (3) This course explores various methods of developing the actual online course content and explores various techniques to move the initial course design from a text driven format to a dynamic, integrated online class. This course also examines various alternative design strategies for enhancing critical thinking and problem solving skills for a specific targeted audience.

  •  

    EDU 546 - Cognition and Metacognition

    (3) This course will explore the differences in thinking strategies and help the teacher articulate a philosophy of teaching thinking skills in the classroom. This class will also include exposure to advanced integrating technology into a classroom technique as well as engaging teachers to develop alternative methods of integrating thinking skills into a curriculum.

  •  

    EDU 548 - Needs Assessment and Evaluation

    (3) This course is an overview of assessment and evaluation as it pertains to Curriculum and Instruction, with emphasis on Practicum design. Consideration is given to evaluation terminology and approaches. An interactive forum provides for discussion of alternative assessment practices.

  •  

    EDU 550 - Research and Analysis Seminar

    (3) The intent of this course is to develop graduate students into intelligent consumers of educational research through the exploration of a variety of research designs and methodologies, analysis of existing research toward practical application, and overview of the capstone research process. Emphasis is on proposal development, capstone design, and steps necessary for completing the MACI capstone.

  •  

    EDU 552 - Web Based Design

    (3) This course is designed as a practical application class where the student learns how to effectively use the basic tools in a web based class. Students will populate an actual Learning Management System shell and explore methods for effectively presenting their course materials, promoting interaction between students, and testing the viability of their course design.

  •  

    EDU 555 - Instructional Leadership

    (3) This course examines curriculum design and the development of institutional professional development plans. Students learn to apply a continuous improvement model to improve teaching and learning in educational settings.

  •  

    EDU 556 - Alternative Teaching Methodologies

    (3) The topics covered in this class will help instructors and trainers develop a higher level of competency in the teaching-learning process through research, practical application workshops, and online seminars. This course will expand students’ skills in adapting to the changing needs of learners through development of individualized alternative teaching methods.

  •  

    EDU 558 - Assessment of Instruction for Diverse Language Learners

    (3) The course examines assessment practices and strategies in English language instruction with special attention to learner differences (social, cultural, physical, and intellectual) that influence academic performance.

  •  

    EDU 560 - Instructional Methodologies

    (3) A survey of curriculum design and instructional methodologies with emphasis on planning learning experiences utilizing instructional models to facilitate positive student achievement in a variety of educational settings.

  •  

    EDU 562 - Ethics and School Law

    (3) This course is an overview of state and federal law pertaining to education. Students examine current policies and legal issues including educator liability, equity and access. Standards for ethical and professional conduct are presented.

  •  

    EDU 564 - Stakeholder Engagement

    (3) This course examines successful models for school, parent, and community partnerships to promote success for all learners, Students identify various stakeholders within local, regional and state-wide systems and their role in promoting and supporting school improvement.

  •  

    EDU 565 - Differentiated Instruction

    (3) The purpose of this course is to introduce and explore the concept of differentiated instruction. Students will explore research-based readings, practical ideas, and hands on activities that will allow them to create a differentiated learning environment.

  •  

    EDU 567 - Approaches and Strategies of Language Teaching

    (3) This semester long course explores approaches, models and strategies in language teaching. It includes 60 hours of field experience. Topics include lesson planning and implementation of the lesson for language and content area instruction.

    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 570 - Teaching Internship

    (2) Teacher candidates must begin a student teaching professional internship which will bring school-based clock hours to the state required minimum of 800 hours in an elementary school setting. Includes proficiency in classroom management; an application of action research applied to the first three sections of Teacher Work Sample; demonstration of professional relationships; proficiency in lesson planning; demonstration of professional adaptability; data driven instruction. (Includes 80 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 606, EDU 515.
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 571 - Student Teaching

    (6) Teaching candidates must successfully complete the student teaching internship and have logged a minimum of 800 school-based clock hours. At the end of Student Teaching, candidates must have demonstrated proficiency on each of the forty-five Colorado Teacher Performance Standards. (Includes 640 field hours)

    Prerequisites: EDU 570
    Fee
    Course fees apply.
  •  

    EDU 573 - Teaching Strategies for Second Language Learners

    (3) This course explores culturally responsive teaching, sheltered instruction, methods and materials needed for teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

  •  

    EDU 575 - Managing Educational Change

    (3) This course explores the critical role of leadership in managing educational change, including emerging standards, policy, and regulations, Students explore approaches to managing school improvement and reform with applications such as conflict management, action planning, and problem solving.

  •  

    EDU 577 - Foundations in English Language Education

    (3) The course explores historical, social, multicultural, legal, and political background of education of culturally and linguistically diverse students in the United States including emphasis on connection between culture and learning, cross-cultural communication, and family.

  •  

    EDU 580 - Integrating Technology into Education

    (3) An overview of current educational technology. Explores the historical and philosophical underpinnings of technology and gives examples of integrating technology into teaching and training, including software, hardware, and multimedia. Students develop instructional plans that effectively apply and integrate educational technology into curriculum development.

  •  

    EDU 582 - Communications and Visual Literacy

    (3) In this class students will develop the set of skills necessary for the interpretation, criticism, and selection of numerous types of images toward the goal of creating and using images to enhance communication in any learning environment. This course combines art history, psychology, philosophy, information design and graphic design with computer interface usability.

  •  

    EDU 602 - Implications of Brain Research for Education

    (3) This course is a survey of brain research with an emphasis on how it impacts teaching and learning. The course focuses on evaluating current brain research and formulating plans to incorporate appropriate strategies or changes into instructional settings. Awareness of current research and how to access the latest findings will be reinforced and expanded through classroom projects and readings.

  •  

    EDU 603 - Advanced Special Needs Strategies

    (3) This graduate level course is designed to help education students understand the integration of exceptional children and adolescents into the regular educational environment in accord with federal and state laws pertaining to exceptional children. The needs of exceptional children are no longer the responsibility of special education, but a shared responsibility of regular education teachers, a team of specialists, parents and family. In order for regular teachers to meet their responsibility, they need to understand and apply knowledge of child development, identification and assessment procedures of exceptional children, adapting and designing educational interventions, and communication strategies with exceptional students, school team members, and parents. The ultimate goal is to provide the very best learning environment for the exceptional student to achieve his/her maximum learning potential.

  •  

    EDU 606 - Advanced Techniques in Classroom Management

    (3) This pedagogical course prepares professional educators to: provide instructional management consistent with various age groups and be responsive to the intellectual, physical, emotional and social needs of the learner. Course content examines major schools of thought and dominant variables involved in classroom management, motivation and discipline. Students learn practical techniques of organizing and arranging classroom experiences to maximize learning. Students will understand the direct relationship of planning, teaching, student learning, reflection and professional growth. (Includes 20 field hours)

  •  

    EDU 625 - Issues in Education

    (3) This course is a survey of current issues in the curriculum and instruction aspects of education. Readings and discussion cover theory, practice, philosophy, trends, future directions, political, and instructional aspects of education. Emphasis is on critical analysis and other process skills.

  •  

    EDU 651 - Capstone

    (3) The capstone project of the MACI program allows for a range of meaningful student projects with integration of research and analysis, needs assessment and evaluation, instructional methodologies, curriculum design or an alternative plan paper.  It is designed for each student to make application within their professional or personal setting.  The final capstone product is designed to assess student analysis and synthesis of research to a practical application product.  The course is offered online for one semester.

    Prerequisites: EDU 500 , EDU 548 , EDU 550 , EDU 560 .
    Notes: A letter grade of B- or higher is required.
  •  

    EDU 681 - Applications of Interactive Technology

    (3) This course is intended to give educators looking at being Web savvy an online opportunity to explore the many tools that the “New” web offers and explore how they can make a difference in their classroom. This will be as robust and meaningful to each student as possible.

  •  

    EDU 691 - Capstone

    (3) This final course assimilates and integrates the student’s readings, discussions and experiences in the Master of Education program. Students complete an action research project applied to their roles as educational leaders.

    Prerequisites: EDU 525 .
    Notes: Grade of B- or higher required.
  •  

    EDU 692 - Leadership Internship

    (3) This internship applies prior course assignments focused on clinical observations, as well as the application of academic knowledge, leadership characteristics, and strategic skills required in school settings. This course culminates the completion of the 300 total hours required toward recommendation to the Colorado Department of Education for principal licensure. There is a limited number of synchronous activities in this course.

    Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all Master of Education in Educational Leadership coursework.
    Notes: A letter grade of B- or higher is required.

English

  •  

    ENG 101A - Basic Composition

    (3) This course focuses on the writing process. Topics in this course include the paragraph development (including introductions, conclusions, and thesis statements) and the development of basic essays. The student must pass the course with a C- or better to fulfill prerequisite for ENG 102A .

    Notes: This course does not fulfill any communication general education requirement. However, the course may be used to satisfy general elective requirements.
    For the English Composition sequence, please see English Composition .
    INT 200A, INT 201A, INT 211A, or PHL 215A should be taken prior to this course.
  •  

    ENG 102A - English Composition

    (3) This course focuses on the effective use of the English language and exploration of rhetorical modes in written composition. Structure, purpose, and audience awareness in developing essays is addressed.

    Prerequisites: Place in ENG 102A or successful completion of ENG 101A  (C-) or better.
    Notes: Course should be completed prior to the completion of 60 credit hours.
    For the English Composition sequence, please see English Composition  .
    INT 200A, INT 201A, INT 211A, or PHL 215A should be taken prior to this course.
  •  

    ENG 104A - Research Writing

    (3) This course focuses on the development and strengthening skills of effective business and professional communication in both written and oral modes. The course includes heavy emphases on effective research and the process of writing with a particular focus on both academic and business writing. Development of skills in research and writing of formal academic papers: critical thinking, argumentation, and documentation.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
  •  

    ENG 201A - Introduction to Literature

    (3) Understand, experience, and evaluate poetry, short fiction, essays, and drama genres, both American and multinational.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 102A  or equivalent.
  •  

    ENG 202A - American Literature I

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and documents in American literature from the Colonial era to the early Republic (1776-1830) through the Romantic-transcendentalist period (1830-1860). Includes readings from multiethnic and women writers.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104A  or equivalent.
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    ENG 203A - American Literature II

    (3) Representative stories, poems, and drama in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Nontraditional ethnic and women’s voices included. Emphasis on interpretation and criticism of American literature.

    Prerequisites: ENG 104A  or equivalent.
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    ENG 255A - Information Literacy

    (3) The ability to use information effectively is essential for success as a student and as a life-long learner. This course strengthens students’ ability to discover, evaluate, and ethically use information. Students examine access and use of information, analyze scholarly information sources, and critically evaluate how political, cultural, social, and academic influences shape information.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
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    ENG 497A - Special Topics

    (3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A ; Junior or senior status.
    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
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    WRT 107A - Technical Writing

    (3) The principles and practices of writing in the business profession. The course deals with the fundamental grammatical principles underlying comprehensible writing.

Entrepreneurship

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    ENT 270A - Entrepreneurship as Mission - From Idea to Market

    (3) Entrepreneurship is the driver of innovation in business today, whether in a new venture, within a corporation or on the mission field. This course is an overview of entrepreneurship with a perspective of purpose and mission for the new venture that can be greater than profits alone. Included are idea generation, social and sustainable entrepreneurship; planning, financing and marketing for the new venture.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
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    ENT 320A - Starting and Running your Business

    (3) Students will work in teams that compete within the retail industry via an entrepreneurship simulation game over the course of the class. Students learn by doing from start-up to the first years of business making decisions about research and development, location, marketing, production and operations, human resources, finance and total quality management.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
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    ENT 330A - Social, Sustainable and Mission Entrepreneurship

    (3) Entrepreneurs and existing companies are realizing that there are intangible benefits to entrepreneurship with a purpose that is greater than just the bottom line. This course explores enterprising entrepreneurial ventures all over the world, highlighting social, sustainable and mission-oriented entrepreneurs with innovative, big ideas. Students will explore how an entrepreneurial venture can be a vehicle for their own purpose in life.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .
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    ENT 340A - Entrepreneurial Growth - The Next Level

    (3) Students expand their application of entrepreneurial skills through a business growth simulation of a manufacturing firm within a given industry. Research and development, marketing, production, finance, human resource management and continuous quality improvement decisions all come into play as student teams compete and seek entrepreneurial growth for their companies.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A , ENT 270A .

Finance

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    FIN 501 - Financial Foundations

    (3) This course will cover the foundational concepts of business finance including the time value of money, security pricing and valuations, portfolio risk and return and derivative securities.

    Prerequisites: Undergraduate-level accounting and finance.

Food and Nutrition Science

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    FNS 220A - Introduction to Nutrition

    (3) This theory course is an introduction to the science of human nutrition. The role of nutrients in supporting human function and preventing disease throughout the lifespan is emphasized. In addition, principles of nutrition are applied to dietary planning.

Geography

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    GEO 270A - World Geography

    (3) A regional study of our planet emphasizing its ecological, economic, and political interdependency. Special emphasis will be given to environmental factors that contribute to cultural diversity and to the complex relationship between the developed and underdeveloped worlds. A primary goal is to promote awareness of other cultures, and our responsibility to fellow human beings and to the environment.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102A .

Global Studies

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    GLS 225A - Field Experience in Global Christianity

    (3) This course trains students in missiological theory as well as in political, economic, cultural, and historical aspects of a particular short-term missions destination. Assignments will synthesize the theory with the field experience, and develop creative ideas about the propagation of Christianity in the global context. Enrollment is restricted to students participating in mission trips. Contact the professor for written permission to enroll and for a schedule of required on-campus class sessions.

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    GLS 497A - Special Topics

    (1 to 3) Guided group investigation and discussion of a selected topic.

    Notes: Graded; may be repeated for credit.
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    GLS 525 - Off-Campus Studies

    (1 to 18) Students attending an approved off-campus semester or summer program may earn credit through a variety of academic experiences.

    Prerequisites: Admission to an approved off-campus study program. See also GLS 425 for undergraduate credit.
    Notes: Requirements will be individualized to each student’s particular situation.
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